Ikebe Shakedown – Ikebe Shakedown

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Ikebe Shakedown, the self-titled album from the Brooklyn-based band, plays with elements of Cinematic Soul, Afro-funk, Deep Disco, and Boogaloo in all the right ways. After spending a few years together the group, named after a favorite Nigerian boogie record (and pronounced “ee-KAY-bay,”) delivers a driving set of tunes featuring a mighty horn section anchored by tight, deep-pocketed grooves.

For more info and buy check: www.ikebeshakedown.com

Tracklist

01. Tujunga
02. Kumasi Walk
03. No Name Bar
04. Tame The Beats
05. Don’t Contradict
06. The Hold Up
07. Refuge
08. In Circles
09. The Viking
10. Five Points
11. Asa-Sa
12. Pepper
13. Sakonsa
14. Green And Black

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Hank Mobley – Workout

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Workout teams tenorman Hank Mobley with guitarist Grant Green for a rousing session that befits the title. Also in attendance are rhythm section aces Wynton Kelly, Paul Chambers, and Philly Joe Jones, who provide swinging support. Muscular tunes like the title track and the aptly titled “Smokin’” are the focus here as the two expertly blow and wail through the changes like frenzied boxers in a title bout. Also included are Mobley’s catchy blues number “Uh Huh” and masterful takes on the standards “The Best Things in Life Are Free” and “Three Coins in the Fountain.” In all, it is easy to hear why Workout is one of Mobley’s quintessential recordings.

Personnel: Hank Mobley (tenor saxophone); Wynton Kelly (piano); Grant Green (guitar); Paul Chambers (bass); Philly Joe Jones (drums).

Tracklist

01. Workout
02. Uh Huh
03. Smokin’
04. The Best Things In Life Are Free
05. Greasin’ Easy
06. Three Coins In A Fountain

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Sam Rivers – Fuchsia Swing Song

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Originally released in 1964, Sam Rivers’ Fuchsia Swing Song was released immediately after his departure from the Miles Davis Quartet. A session player and former member of Herb Pomeroy’s Big Band prior to working with Miles, this auspicious debut displays both his influences and that he was a self-assured seasoned player transitioning into greatness.

Personnel: Sam Rivers (tenor sax); Jaki Byard (piano); Ron Carter (bass); Anthony Williams (drums)

Tracklist

01. Fuchsia Swing Song
02. Downstairs Blues Upstairs
03. Cyclic Episode
04. Luminous Monolith
05. Beatrice
06. Ellipsis
07. Luminous Monolith (Alternate Take)
08. Downstairs Blues Upstairs (First Alterate Take)
09. Downstairs Blues Upstairs (Second Alternate Take)
10. Downstairs Blues Upstairs (Third Alternate Take)

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Bobby Hutcherson – Patterns

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All of Bobby Hutcherson’s late ’60s Blue Note dates are excellent examples of superior ensemble interaction coupled with fascinating compositions. 1968′s Patterns features the vibraphonist leading a quintet capable of tremendous textural changes and near-classical sophistication. The group offers its interpretation of six spellbinding pieces (plus one extra take of the title track), most of which were composed by drummer Joe Chambers. On this must-have session Stanley Cowell (piano), Reggie Workman (bass) and saxophonist James Spaulding (who also adds beautiful colors on flute) round out the group.

Personnel: Bobby Hutcherson (vibraphone); James Spaulding (alto saxophone, flute); Stanley Cowell (piano); Reggie Workman (bass); Joe Chambers (drums).

Tracklist

01. Effi
02. Ankara
03. A Time To Go
04. Patterns
05. Irina
06. Nocturnal
07. Patterns (Alternate Take)

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Duke Pearson – Dedication!

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Recorded for a small label that proceeded to go broke, Dedication! would not be released until nine years after its initial recording. This seems odd considering the all-star cast of players. Pianist Duke Pearson is joined by trumpeter Freddie Hubbard, baritone player Pepper Adams, trombonist Willie Wilson, bassist Thomas Howard, and drummer Lex Humphries on seven selections. The set kicks off with Tommy Flanagan’s “Minor Mishap,” an upbeat piece that brings forth nice solos from everyone. This might be Pearson’s session, but everybody is given plenty of room to cut loose. Wilson, for instance, is featured for the length of “The Nearness of You” and for a great deal of “Time After Time.” This is fortunate in retrospect; he made few recordings and would pass away in 1963, two years after this record was made. Pearson also turns in a number of nice solos. Like Hank Jones, his light touch serves him well on instrumentals like “Blues for Alvina” and “Time After Time.” The performances by Hubbard and Adams are topnotch throughout; they turn in first-rate work on numbers like Donald Byrd’s “Lex” and the Pearson original “The Number Five.” An important factor in the success of this album is the unusual combination of trumpet, trombone, and baritone saxophone that creates a resonant, full sound. Pearson would make a number of other fine recordings for Blue Note during the ’60s, but none finer than this one. Dedication! serves as a fine introduction to a talented pianist.

Personnel: Duke Pearson (piano); Pepper Adams (baritone saxophone, brass); Freddie Hubbard (trumpet); Wilfred Wilson, Willie Wilson (trombone); Lex Humphries (drums).

Tracklist

01. Minor Mishap
02. Number Five (aka Miss Bertha D. Blues)
03. The Nearness Of You
04. Apothegm
05. Lex
06. Blues For Alvina
07. Time After Time

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Stanley Turrentine with The Three Sounds – Blue Hour: The Complete Sessions

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Stanley Turrentine & the Three Sounds were initially featured together on an album called Blue Hour, which was a very relaxed and bluesy release. The spaciousness of “I Want a Little Girl” makes the listener savor every note, while “Gee Baby, Ain’t I Good to You” is played with an almost identical tempo and feeling. Gene Harris’ “Blue Riff” picks up the pace a good bit, before “Since I Fell for You” and “Willow Weep for Me” once again slow the proceedings back to a late-night feeling. Turrentine’s tenor sax is in top form, while Harris is the consummate blues pianist in his supporting role. After the first CD reissue of Blue Hour went out of print, it was expanded into a two-CD set by Blue Note, with eight new unissued or alternate takes added on the second disc. It is apparent right away that the original producer Alfred Lion was correct in withholding most of these recordings from release. As well as Turrentine plays during “Blues in the Closet,” the rhythm section seems a bit stiff. Harris’ piano is too much in the background on “Just in Time,” while the pianist’s composition “Blue Hour” doesn’t seem to be fully formed as a blues vehicle. “Strike Up the Band” is the one truly up-tempo recording present on this release, but probably wasn’t issued previously because it is faded prematurely and it was so different from the producer’s concept for the originally conceived release. Regardless, since both Stanley Turrentine and Gene Harris passed away within a year of each other in 2000, having additional music made available featuring these two fine musicians is most welcome.

Personnel: Stanley Turrentine (tenor saxophone); Gene Harris (piano); Andrew Simpkins (bass); Bill Dowdy (drums).

Tracklist

CD1
01. I Want a Little Girl
02. Gee Baby, Ain’t I Good To You
03. Blue Riff
04. Since I Fell For You
05. Willow Weep For Me
CD2
01. Blues In The Closet
02. Just In Time
03. Gee Baby, Ain’t I Good To You
04. Where or When
05. Blue Hour
06. There Is No Greater Love
07. Alone Together
08. Strike Up The Band

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Donald Byrd – Fuego

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Donald Byrd’s Fuego is one of the many fine hard-bop sets the trumpeter recorded for Blue Note throughout the late 1950s and ’60s. Featuring all Byrd originals, from the driving pulse of the opening title track to the gospel-tinged “Amen,” which closes out the album, Fuego has much to recommend it. There are top-notch personnel (Jackie McLean lends his soulful sax work to the proceedings), strong compositions, and a relaxed, open feel throughout. And, of course, Rudy Van Gelder’s pristine engineering is the icing on the cake.

Personnel: Donald Byrd (trumpet); Jackie McLean (alto saxophone); Duke Pearson (piano); Doug Watkins (bass); Lex Humphries (drums).

Tracklist

01. Fuego
02. Bup A Loup
03. Funky Mama
04. Low Life
05. Lmanet
06. Amen

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Bill Evans – How My Heart Sings!

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A new Bill Evans Trio re-entered the studio in the spring of 1962, nearly one year after the untimely death of innovative bassist Scott LaFaro. Chuck Israels was LaFaro’s replacement, and while he would never take musical charge the way LaFaro did, his supportive presence and solid sound helped make this second edition of the Trio a worthy successor. The 1962 dates produced two albums’ worth of material. The previously released Moonbeams was lyrical yet somber, while the altogether brighter How My Heart Sings! consistently swings. There is little evidence here of the depressive slump which caused Evans to take off the previous year in response to LaFaro’s death.

Just as on Moonbeams, we are introduced here to new Evans originals, additions to a growing and impressive catalog, like “Walking Up” and the exhilarating “Show-Type Tune” in which the pianist puts on his best Bud Powell hat, knocking off line after line of thrillingly executed runs. Add Earl Zindar’s haunting title track, then a nod to Dave Brubeck on the two takes of the latter’s “In Your Own Sweet Way” and How My Heart Sings stands as the most varied Bill Evans set since his breakthrough Everybody Digs Bill Evans.

Bill Evans Trio: Bill Evans (piano); Chuck Israels (bass); Paul Motian (drums).

Tracklist

01. How My Heart Sings
02. I Should Care
03. In Your Own Sweet Way (Take 1)
04. In Your Own Sweet Way (Take 2)
05. Walking Up
06. Summertime
07. 34 Skidoo
08. Ev’rything I Love
09. Show-Type Tune

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Kenny Dorham – Una Mas

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Trumpeter Kenny Dorham was a significant presence in the bop and hard bop scenes, a musician whose distinctive, lyrical style had been apparent from his work in the late ’40s with Charlie Parker’s quintet. The year 1963 was especially good for him. He had just returned from a trip to Brazil where he had been absorbing the bossa nova, and he had formed a musical partnership with Joe Henderson, a powerful young tenor saxophonist whose rugged sound and coiling lines were an ideal complement to Dorham’s often subtler approach. This session is the first in a series of dates that would pair the two, and the fifteen minute “Una Mas,” a percolating mix of hard bop sonorities and a samba beat, was the first recorded example of Dorham’s distinctive exploration of bossa nova (his “Blue Bossa” would become a jazz standard).

Personnel: Kenny Dorham (trumpet); Joe Henderson (tenor saxophone); Herbie Hancock (piano); Butch Warren (bass); Tony Williams (drums).

Tracklist

01. Una Mas (One More Time)
02. Straight Ahead
03. Sao Paulo
04. If Ever I Would Leave You

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Erik Truffaz – Out Of a Dream

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Truffaz has experimented with electronica-tinged dance music and ensemble improvisation, but on his 1997 major label debut Out Of A Dream, he channels the spirit and sound of Miles Davis. The way Truffaz delicately and economically phrases smatterings of thin warm notes begs comparison with Miles. But Truffaz doesn’t just play parrot here, he takes that classic sound and wraps it around a bunch of elegant tunes that you’d swear were laid down decades ago.

Tracklist

01. Down Town
02. Out Of a Dream
03. Beaute Bleue
04. Wet In Paris
05. Porta Camollia
06. Indigo
07. Saisir
08. Elegie
09. Samara
10. Up Town
11. Betty

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The Miles Davis Story

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Trumpeter-bandleader Miles Davis (1926-91) was a catalyst for the major innovations in post-bop, cool jazz, hard-bop, and jazz-fusion, and his wispy and emotional trumpet tones were some of the most evocative sounds ever heard. He was also one of the most identifiable and misunderstood pop icons of the 20th century. This engrossing British documentary shows the complex layers of this magnificent and mercurial artist. Through rare footage and interviews, we learn of Davis’s middle-class upbringing and his early days with bop legends Dizzy Gillespie and Charlie Parker. The documentary bluntly deals with Davis’s narcotic nadir and his rise from the depths to become a bona fide jazz icon in the mid-’50s to late ’60s. But the most penetrating and poignant portraits of Davis come from musicians who played with and were influenced by him, including Shirley Horn, Herbie Hancock, Joe Zawinul, and Keith Jarrett.

Outstanding musical selections include modal masterpieces “So What” and “Blue in Green,” the haunting soundtrack to the 1957 French film Ascenseur pour l’échafaud, his romantic rendition of Cyndi Lauper’s “Time After Time,” and his collaborations with arranger Gil Evans. The most surprising aspects of Davis’s personality that emerge from this film are his shyness, vulnerability, and, yes, humility. As he said himself, “Don’t call me a legend. Call me Miles Davis.” –Eugene Holley Jr.

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John Coltrane – Soultrane

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This wonderful 1958 session features the tenor sax legend leading pianist Red Garland, bassist Paul Chambers and drummer Arthur Taylor on a well-chosen five-song set of jazz and pop standards. The album opens with a lively version of Count Basie’s “Good Bait” that allows Coltrane, Chambers and Garland to indulge in some exquisite, highly inventive solos. While Coltrane’s versions of Billy Eckstine’s “I Want To Talk About You” and Fred Lacey’s “Theme For Ernie” are pretty much straight ballad performances, his bold, powerful style brings out the soulful feel of these two beautiful, reflective melodies.

Personnel: John Coltrane (vocals, tenor saxophone); John Coltrane; Paul Chambers (upright bass); Red Garland (piano); Art Taylor (drums).

Tracklist

01. Good Bait
02. I Want To Talk About You
03. You Say You Care
04. Theme For Ernie
05. Russian Lullaby

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Jackie McLean – Demon’s Dance

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The late alto saxophonist Jackie McLean had one of the most distinctive sounds in jazz history–fluid and bittersweet, with an impassioned “cry” at its heart. McLean made several classic albums for Blue Note in the 1960s, with Demon’s Dance arriving in 1967, near the end of his time with the label. While not as well known as his other albums, Dance exhibits some excellent bristling, surging hard bop, much of which features trumpeter Woody Shaw–most notably on the indelible, infectious would-be hit “Sweet Love of Mine.”

Personnel: Jackie McLean (alto saxophone); Jackie McLean; Scott Holt (bass instrument); Woody Shaw (trumpet); LaMont Johnson (piano); Jack DeJohnette (drums).

Tracklist

01. Demon’s Dance
02. Toyland
03. Boo Ann’s Grand
04. Sweet Love Of Mine
05. Floogeh
06. Message From Trane

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Don Rendell/Ian Carr Quintet – Shades Of Blue

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If ever there was a golden period in British jazz it was the 1960s, with Don Rendell and Ian Carr, 2 of the most innovative musicians around, with the albums their quintet produced now legendary, and still fresh and stunning in their simplicity and power. This comes not only from the exquisite playing of Ian Carr on flugelhorn and trumpet, and Don Rendell’s tough tenor and soprano excursions, but equally from the thought that had gone into the writing and arranging.

The dynamics of the quintet members are beautifully balanced, with the lyrical playing of pianist Michael Garrick an often wistful counter to the searching bass of Dave Green, and the ever changing, explosive patterns from drummer Trevor Tomkins. There had never been such concise small ensemble playing since Miles Davis and John Coltrane came together in the 1950s.

little preview:

Tracklist

01. Blue Mosque
02. Latin Blue
03. Just Blue
04. Sailin’
05. Garrison ’64
06. Blue Doom
07. Shades Of Blue
08. Big City Strut

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John Coltrane with The Red Garland Trio – Traneing In

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With this session, recorded in the summer of 1957, John Coltrane came out from behind the harmonic safety net of a three-horn frontline to focus on his own imposing gifts as an improviser. As the only horn on Traneing In, the young tenor giant revels in the spotlight, demonstrating some of the hard-won lessons from his long apprenticeship with Thelonious Monk’s group that very summer at New York’s Five Spot club.

Red Garland basks in the cruise-control cool of the Art Taylor/Paul Chambers rhythm team on the title tune, and his jaunty opening chords serve to italicize this blues’ deep, deep groove. When Coltrane enters, the rhythm section ups the ante, from Basie-esque tippling to a driving testimonial. Coltrane’s dense harmonic variations unwind in nervous, compulsive layers of sound. Yet for all his complexity, a fervent preacher’s cry remains at the heart of his every utterance. After a stunning Chambers solo, Garland returns with intricate Bud Powell-like variations and stately, driving block chords which incite Coltrane to further melodic delirium.

Typical of his other Prestige dates, Coltrane carefully contrasts edgy moments of tension with interludes of gentle restraint. Chambers’ sultry opening chords to “Slow Dance” give this ballad an oddly spectral cast, until Trane doubles up on the changes. “Bass Blues” finds the limber Chambers doubling the melody with Coltrane, as Garland and Taylor intersperse witty little asides, while “You Leave Me Breathless” is Coltrane at his most romantic, soaring on angel wings into an expressive upper register. Finally, Coltrane and Chambers roar ahead like…well, like a runaway train, on “Soft Lights And Sweet Music,” as Taylor and Garland hold on for dear life.

Personnel: John Coltrane (tenor saxophone); Red Garland (piano); Paul Chambers (bass guitar); Art Taylor (drums).

Tracklist

01. Traneing In
02. Slow Dance
03. Bass Blues
04. You Leave Me Breathless
05. Soft Lights And Sweet Music

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Eric Dolphy – Far Cry

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The complete original album Far Cry (Prestige/New Jazz 8270), featuring Eric Dolphy in a quintet format with another star who passed away before his time, trumpeter Booker Little. Among the many highlights are an outstanding version of the Billie Holiday-Mal Waldron ballad “Left Alone” and Dolphy’s unaccompanied alto sax reading of “Tenderly”. As a bonus, two tunes originally issued under the name the Jazz Artists Guild, both of which were recorded on the same date on November 1, 1960, and each featuring one of the stars of Far Cry: Dolphy on “T’Ain’t Nobody’s Business if I Do”, and Little on “Cliff Walk”.

Personnel: Eric Dolphy (alto saxophone, flute, bass clarinet); Booker Little (trumpet); Jaki Byard (piano); Ron Carter (bass); Roy Haynes (drums).

Tracklist

01. Mrs. Parker Of K.C. (Bird’s Mother)
02. Ode To Charlie Parker
03. Far Cry
04. Miss Ann
05. Left Alone
06. Tenderly
07. It’s Magic
08. Serene

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Dexter Gordon – Gettin’ Around

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After two Blue Note LPs recorded in Europe (his adopted home since 1962), Gordon finally made it back to the States to record this mid-Sixties release. Curiously, the two previously unreleased tunes seem slightly out of place with the rest of the record, and feel more akin to the kind of work Gordon’s labelmates were releasing at the time. “Flick of a Trick” is a sultry, walking eight-bar blues, while “Very Saxily Yours,” distinguishes itself from the standards here by virtue of its riffing melody and use of hits during the head.

Having said that, part of the appeal of Gordon’s approach is the way this album is built from standards. There’s a sense of getting down to basics, from the passion and depths that can come out in a ballad to the sheer joy of swinging hard on the uptempo tunes. “Le Coiffeur” now sounds a little dated (like the theme from a lost Sixties sitcom), but there’s something charming about that, as there is about the loping exuberance of “Shiny Stockings” and the presence of “Manha de Carnaval,” a recent movie theme at the time.

Personnel: Dexter Gordon (tenor saxophone); Dexter Gordon; Bob Cranshaw (upright bass); Barry Harris (piano); Bobby Hutcherson (vibraphone); Billy Higgins (drums).

Tracklist

01. Manha De Carnaval
02. Who Can I Turn To (When Nobody Needs Me)
03. Heartaches
04. Shiny Stockings
05. Everybody’s Somebody’s Fool
06. Le Coiffeur
07. Very Saxily Yours
08. Flick Of A Trick

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Freddie Hubbard – Minor Mishap

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This 1961 session-first released on Fontana in the late ’60s, now reissued on Black Lion-offers a look at a young Hubbard before his reputation with Art Blakey’s Jazz Messengers took hold and he became known as the future of jazz trumpeting. Listening to Hubbard take control from trombonist Willie Wilson in the third cut, “Blues For Alvina,” and bend the ensemble’s mood and pacing around a masterfully built improvisation shows that the future bandleader and innovator had already made the scene.

Pianist Dick Pearson’s trio comprises the steady, always-swining rhythm section heard here. Tracks six and seven, two versions of Pearson’s “Number Five,” present an interesting opportunity to hear the variations that occur among great players from take to take. Hubbard’s efforts in the second are edgier, driving the sextet toward a hotter sound more alive with nuance. Both Hubbard and baritone saxophonist Pepper Adams work Donald Byrd’s “Lex,” and the differences are subtle but significant. This is the early work of a great young trumpet player about to explode.

Personnel: Freddie Hubbard (trumpet, horns); Pepper Adams (baritone saxophone); W. Wilson, Willie Wilson (trombone); Duke Pearson (piano); Lex Humphries (drums).

Tracklist

01. Minor Mishap (Take 3)
02. Minor Mishap (Take 4)
03. Blues For Alvina (Take 3)
04. Blues For Alvina (Take 5)
05. The Nearness Of You (Take 3)
06. Number Five (Take 3)
07. Number Five (Take 5)
08. Lex (Take 2)
09. Lex (Take 4)
10. Time After Time (Take 2)
11. Apothegm (Take 6)
12. Apothegm (Take 14)

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Bobby Hutcherson – Happenings

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Happenings was vibraphonist Bobby Hutcherson’s fourth Blue Note release as a leader. Where its predecessors Dialogue and Components were packed with challenging avant-bop, Happenings instead brings things down a notch. With pianist Herbie Hancock, drummer Joe Chambers, and bassist Bob Cranshaw on board, Hutcherson keeps the tone fairly light, performing his original compositions (the exception is Hancock’s “Maiden Voyage”) with a mellow, swinging style that emphasizes modal exploration. The performances are all top-notch, and the album still weighs in as one of the best in Hutcherson’s fine catalogue.

Personnel: Bobby Hutcherson (vibraphone, marimba); Herbie Hancock (piano); Bob Cranshaw (bass); Joe Chambers (drums).

Tracklist

01. Aquarian Moon
02. Bouquet
03. Rojo
04. Maide Voyage
05. Head Start
06. When You Are Near
07. The Omen

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John Coltrane – First Meditations

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Not released initially until 1977, the music on this 1992 CD was the last recording made by the classic John Coltrane Quartet; other slightly later records found the group augmented by additional musicians. Four of the five movements on this release (which are augmented by a lengthier second version of “Joy”) would become part of the better-known Meditations album (along with another movement) 2½-months later when tenor saxophonist Pharoah Sanders and drummer Rashied Ali temporarily made the group a sextet. Coltrane (sticking here exclusively to tenor) plays passionately, alternating ferocious explorations with more lyrical sections.

Tracklist

01. Love
02. Compassion
03. Joy
04. Consequences
05. Serenity
06. Joy (Alternate Version)

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