Lee Morgan – The Procrastinator

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In 1961 Lee Morgan and Wayne Shorter formed the frontline of one of the greatest versions of Art Blakey’s Jazz Messengers. In 1967 they had a reunion for The Procrastinator, showing just how much they both had grown through the years. Morgan, who had a major hit with “The Sidewinder” a few years earlier, had broken away from the Clifford Brown trumpet tradition to become a brash, adventurous and consistently stunning soloist who perfectly symbolized the era. Morgan’s brand of forward-looking hard bop was influenced by free jazz and put a premium on uninhibited self-expression. Shorter sounded unlike anyone else and wrote highly original compositions. Playing in a sextet with Bobby Hutcherson and Herbie Hancock, Morgan and Shorter contributed all of the songs which include the funky “Party Time” (which could have been a hit for Horace Silver) and other pieces that push hard bop to its limit. The results are exhilarating, vital and timeless.

Personnel: Lee Morgan (trumpet); Herbie Hancock (piano); Ron Carter (bass); Wayne Shorter (tenor saxophone); Bobby Hutcherson (vibraphone); Billy Higgins (drums).

Tracklist

01. The Procastinator
02. Party Time
03. Dear Sir
04. Stopstart
05. Rio
06. Soft Touch

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Aretha Franklin – I Never Loved A Man The Way I Love You

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After the end of Aretha Franklin’s five year stint on Columbia Records (who tried marketing her as a jazz vocalist), she signed on with Atlantic Records. Produced by music biz veteran Jerry Wexler, Franklin’s Atlantic debut found her flexing creative muscle and making music that forever altered the course of pop and soul. Accompanying herself on piano throughout, Franklin’s powerful and passionate vocals garnered comparisons to Ray Charles, while her blend of R&B, gospel and jazz rightfully earned her the moniker “Queen Of Soul.” (cduniverse)

Personnel: Aretha Franklin (vocals, piano); Chips Moman, Jimmy Johnson (guitar); King Curtis, Charlie Chalmers (tenor saxophone); Willie Bridges (bass saxophone); Melvin Lastie (trumpet, cornet); Dewey “Spooner” Oldham (keyboards); Tommy Cogbill (bass); Gene Chrisman, Roger Hawkins (drums); Carolyn Franklin (background vocals).

thx n.

Tracklist

01. Respect
02. Drown In My Own Tears
03. I Never Loved A Man (The Way I Love You)
04. Soul Serenade
05. Don’t Let Me Lose This Dream
06. Baby Baby Baby
07. Dr. Feelgood (Love is a Serious Business)
08. Good Times
09. Do Right Woman – Do Right Man
10. Save Me
11. Change Is Gonna Come
12. Respect (Stereo Version)
13. I Never Loved A Man (The Way I Love You) (Stereo Version)
14. Do Right Woman – Do Right Man (Stereo Version)

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Etta Jones – Don’t Go To Strangers

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Don’t Go to Strangers was Etta Jones’ first album for the independent jazz label Prestige when it was released in 1960 (having been recorded in a single session on June 21 of that year), and although Jones had been releasing records since 1944, including a dozen sides for RCA in 1946 and an album for King Records in 1957, she was treated as an overnight sensation when the title tune from the album went gold, hitting the Top 40 on the pop charts and reaching number five on the R&B charts. An elegant ballad on an album that had several of them, including the masterful “If I Had You” and a marvelous reading of “All the Way,” a song usually identified with Frank Sinatra, “Don’t Go to Strangers” featured Jones’ airy, bluesy phrasing and uncanny sense of spacing, and was very much a jazz performance, making its success on the pop charts all the more amazing. Listen to Jones’ restructuring of the melody to the opening track, the old chestnut “Yes Sir, That’s My Baby,” to hear a gifted jazz singer sliding and shifting the tone center of a song like a veteran horn player, all the while leaving the melody still recognizable, but refreshing it until it stands revealed anew. Apparently there were no additional tracks cut at the session, since bonus material has never surfaced on any of the album’s subsequent reissues, although that’s hardly a problem, because as is, Don’t Go to Strangers is a perfect gem of a recording. ~ Steve Leggett

Personnel: Etta Jones (vocals); Etta Jones; George Duvivier (upright bass); Skeeter Best (guitar); Frank Wess (flute, tenor saxophone); Richard Wyands (piano); Roy Haynes (drums).

Tracklist

01. Yes Sir, That’s My Baby
02. Don’t Go to Strangers
03. I Love Paris
04. Fine and Mellow
05. Where or When
06. If I Had You
07. On the Street Where You Live
08. Something to Remember You By
09. Bye Bye Blackbird
10. All the Way

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Roy Ayers – Virgo Vibes

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Long before becoming an acid jazz icon and figurehead to a new generation of hip-hop and house artists, Roy Ayers was a promising young jazz vibraphonist. His second solo album and Atlantic debut, is a vital root note for all future keepers of the funk. Includes 2 previously unreleased tracks ‘Mine Boyd’ & ‘Number Seven’.

Personnel: Roy Ayers (vibraphone); Joe Henderson (tenor saxophone); Charles Tolliver (trumpet); Ronald Clark (piano); Carr (drums).

Tracklist

01. The Ringer
02. Ayerloom
03. In The Limelight
04. Virgo Vibes
05. Glow Flower
06. Mine Royd
07. Number Seven

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Stan Getz – Sweet Rain

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One of Stan Getz’s all-time greatest albums, Sweet Rain was his first major artistic coup after he closed the book on his bossa nova period, featuring an adventurous young group that pushed him to new heights in his solo statements. Pianist Chick Corea, bassist Ron Carter, and drummer Grady Tate were all schooled in ’60s concepts of rhythm-section freedom, and their continually stimulating interplay helps open things up for Getz to embark on some long, soulful explorations (four of the five tracks are over seven minutes). The neat trick of Sweet Rain is that the advanced rhythm section work remains balanced with Getz’s customary loveliness and lyricism. Indeed, Getz plays with a searching, aching passion throughout the date, which undoubtedly helped Mike Gibbs’ title track become a standard after Getz’s tender treatment here. The quartet’s level of musicianship remains high on every selection, and the marvelously consistent atmosphere the album evokes places it among Getz’s very best. A surefire classic.  (allmusic)

Personnel: Stan Getz (tenor saxophone); Albert Daily (piano); Chick Corea (electric piano); Stanley Clarke, George Mraz (bass); Tony Williams, Billy Hart (drums).

Tracklist

01. Litha
02. O Grande Amour
03. Sweet Rain
04. Con Alma
05. Windows

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Duke Pearson – The Right Touch

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Duke Pearson rises to the challenge of writing for an all-star octet (with trumpeter Freddie Hubbard, trombonist Garnett Brown, altoist James Spaulding, Jerry Dodgion on alto and flute, Stanley Turrentine on tenor, bassist Gene Taylor, drummer Grady Tate, and the leader/pianist), contributing colorful frameworks and consistently challenging compositions. The set is full of diverse melodies (the CD reissue has a previously unissued take of “Los Malos Hombres”) played by a variety of distinctive soloists; many of these songs deserve to be revived. This is one of the finest recordings of Duke Pearson’s career.

Personnel: Duke Pearson (piano); Freddie Hubbard (trumpet); Garnett Brown (trombone); Jerry Dodgion (alto saxophone, flute); James Spaulding (alto saxophone); Stanley Turrentine (tenor saxophone); Gene Taylor (bass); Grady Tate (drums).

Tracklist

01. Chili Peppers
02. Make It Good
03. My Love Waits (O Meu Amor Espera)
04. Los Malos Hombres
05. Scrap Iron
06. Rotary
07. Los Malos Hombres (Alternate Take)

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Ennio Morricone – Scusi, Facciamo L’Amore?

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Soundtrack of “Scusi, Facciamo L’Amore? (Listen, Let’s Make Love)” Composed By the great Ennio Morricone, enjoy!

Tracklist

01. Scusi, Facciamo L’Amore? (Original Single Version Side A)
02. A Lidia (Original Single Version Side B)
03. Scusi, Facciamo L’Amore? (Between The Sheets)
04. Scusi, Facciamo L’Amore? (From Bed to Worse)
05. Scusi, Facciamo L’Amore? (Take Me Now)
06. Scusi, Facciamo L’Amore? (Dog Up a Tree)
07. A Lidia
08. Scusi, Facciamo L’Amore? (To The Altar and Back)
09. Scusi, Facciamo L’Amore? (After The Party)
10. Scusi, Facciamo L’Amore? (Passion Play)
11. Scusi, Facciamo L’Amore? (Reprise)
12. Scusi, Facciamo L’Amore? (Lay Down, I Think I Love You)
13. Scusi, Facciamo L’Amore? (Various Troubles)
14. Scusi, Facciamo L’Amore? (Knowing The Ins and Outs)
15. A Lidia
16. Scusi, Facciamo L’Amore? (Two Cigarettes)
17. Scusi, Facciamo L’Amore? (The Big One)
18. Scusi, Facciamo L’Amore?
19. A Lidia (Finale)

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Sam Rivers – A New Conception

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The title of A New Conception refers to Sam Rivers’ ingenious interpretations of standards on this record. Rivers treats the songs — such familiar items as “When I Fall in Love,” “I’ll Never Smile Again,” “That’s All,” “What a Difference a Day Makes,” and “Secret Love” — with respect, but he doesn’t treat them as museum pieces. He knows that if the songs are to remain fresh, they need to be heard in different ways, and he skillfully opens up each composition to contemporary avant-garde techniques. Rivers and his supporting trio of pianist Hal Galper, bassist Herbert Lewis, and drummer Steve Ellington gradually ease each number into more adventurous territory, slowly shifting into exploratory instrumental sections, slyly varying the melodic themes, or adding shaded dissonant textures. It’s challenging music that remains accessible, since it reconfigures familiar items in new, intriguing ways. The sheer skill in Rivers’ arrangements once again confirms his large, unfortunately underappreciated, talent.

Personnel: Sam Rivers (tenor and soprano saxophone, flute), Hal Galper (piano), Herbie Lewis (bass), Steve Ellington (drums)

Tracklist

01. When I Fall In Love
02. I’ll Never Smile Again
03. Detour Ahead
04. That’s All
05. What a Difference a Day Makes
06. Temptation
07. Secret Love

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Lou Donaldson – Alligator Bogaloo

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Alligator Bogaloo is one example of Lou Donaldson’s successful combinations of hard bop and soul-jazz. Of the six tunes, three are Donaldson originals, including the title hit. The excellent band, consisting of Melvin Lastin, Sr. on cornet, George Benson on guitar, Lonnie Smith on organ, and Leo Morris on drums, mixes laid-back vamps beneath driving hard bop charts. As the ’60s turned into the ’70s, Donaldson began shaving off hard bop invention for a more radio-friendly and 45 rpm length, leaving soulful — yet monotonous — vamping. At that point, Donaldson’s material suffered from a lack of originality. That’s not the case on Alligator Bogaloo.

Tracklist

01. Alligator Bogaloo
02. One Cylinder
03. The Thang
04. Aw Shucks!
05. Rev. Moses
06. I Want A Little Girl

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Jackie McLean – Demon’s Dance

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The late alto saxophonist Jackie McLean had one of the most distinctive sounds in jazz history–fluid and bittersweet, with an impassioned “cry” at its heart. McLean made several classic albums for Blue Note in the 1960s, with Demon’s Dance arriving in 1967, near the end of his time with the label. While not as well known as his other albums, Dance exhibits some excellent bristling, surging hard bop, much of which features trumpeter Woody Shaw–most notably on the indelible, infectious would-be hit “Sweet Love of Mine.”

Personnel: Jackie McLean (alto saxophone); Jackie McLean; Scott Holt (bass instrument); Woody Shaw (trumpet); LaMont Johnson (piano); Jack DeJohnette (drums).

Tracklist

01. Demon’s Dance
02. Toyland
03. Boo Ann’s Grand
04. Sweet Love Of Mine
05. Floogeh
06. Message From Trane

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Cal Tjader – Hip Vibrations

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Cal Tjader recorded frequently for Verve during the 1960s, yet this is one of his more unusual sessions. Instead of fronting his regular group in a typical Latin setting, the vibraphonist plays arrangements by Benny Golson or Bobby Bryant, accompanied a band that includes Ernie Royal, Marvin Stamm, J.J. Johnson, Jerome Richardson, Mel Lewis, either Ron Carter or Richard Davis on bass, and three different pianists: Herbie Hancock, Patti Bown, or John Bunch. The solo focus is almost exclusively on the leader in these fairly brief charts, though there are brief spotlights on Richardson and Hancock. The best tracks are Golson’s “Blues March,” John Lewis’ “Django,” and Tjader’s “Hip Vibrations.” A pair of current pop songs of the day (“Georgy Girl” and “Windy,” the latter a hit for the rock group the Association) seem a little out of place but prove to be no more than innocuous. This 1967 session has long been out of print and seems like it might be an unlikely candidate for reissue, but there’s enough good music within it to justify picking it up if it can be located.

Tracklist

01. Blues March
02. Georgy Girl
03. Hip Vibrations
04. A Waltz For Diane
05. Windy
06. Sweet Honeybee
07. Django
08. Moanin’
09. Canto De Ossanha

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Wayne Shorter Albums!

Though some will argue about whether Wayne Shorter’s primary impact on jazz has been as a composer or as a saxophonist, hardly anyone will dispute his overall importance as one of jazz’s leading figures over a long span of time. Though indebted to a great extent to John Coltrane, with whom he practiced in the mid-’50s while still an undergraduate, Shorter eventually developed his own more succinct manner on tenor sax, retaining the tough tone quality and intensity and in later years, adding an element of funk. On soprano, Shorter is almost another player entirely, his lovely tone shining like a light beam, his sensibilities attuned more to lyrical thoughts, his choice of notes becoming more spare as his career unfolded. Shorter’s influence as a player, stemming mainly from his achievements in the 1960s and ’70s, has been tremendous upon the neo-bop brigade who emerged in the early ’80s, most notably Branford Marsalis. As a composer, he is best known for carefully conceived, complex, long-limbed, endlessly winding tunes, many of which have become jazz standards yet have spawned few imitators.

for more info and buy check: vervemusicgroup.com/wayneshorter

1959 – Introducing Wayne Shorter
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Tracklist

01. Blues A La Carte
02. Harry’s Last Land
03. Down In The Depths
04. Pug Nose
05. Black Diamond
06. Mack The Knife
07. Blues A La Carte (Alternate Take)
08. Harry’s Last Stand (Alternate Take)
09. Down In The Depths (Alternate Take)
10. Black Diamond (Alternate Take)

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1960 – Second Genesis
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Tracklist

01. Ruby & The Pearl
02. Pay As You Go
03. Second Genesis
04. Mr.Chariman
05. Tenderfoot
06. The Albatross
07. Getting To Know You
08. I Didn’t Know What Time It Was

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1962 – Wayning Moments
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Tracklist

01. Black Orpheus (Take 4)
02. Devil’s Island (Take 8 )
03. Moon Of Manakoor (Take 2)
04. Dead-End (Take 8 )
05. Wayning MOments (Take 2)
06. Powder Keg (Take 5)
07. All Or Nothing At All (Take 3)
08. Callaway Went That A Way (Take 3)
09. Black Orpheus (Take 3)
10. Devil’s Island (Take 7)
11. Moon Manakoor (Take 1)
12. Dead End (Take 7)
13. Wayning Moments (Take 3)
14. Powder Keg (Take 1)
15. Callaway Wen That A Way (Take 1)

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1964 – Juju
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Tracklist

01. Juju
02. Deluge
03. House Of Jade
04. Mahjong
05. Yes Or No
06. Twelve More Bars To Go
07. Juju (Alternate Take)
08. House Of Jade (Alternate Take)

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1964 – Night Dreamer
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Tracklist

01. Night Dreamer
02. Oriental Folk Song
03. Virgo
04. Black Nile
05. Charcoal Blues
06. Armageddon
07. Virgo (Alternate Take)

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1964 – Speak No Evil
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Tracklist

01. Witch Hunt
02. Fee-Fi-Fo-Fum
03. Dance Cadaverous
04. Speak No Evil
05. Infant Eyes
06. Wild Flower
07. Dance Cadaverous (Alternate Take)

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1965 – Etcetera
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Tracklist

01. Etceter
02. Penelope
03. Toy Tune
04. Barracudas (General Assembly)
05. Indian Song

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1965 – The All Seeing Eye
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Tracklist

01. The All Seeing Eye
02. Genesis
03. Chaos
04. Face Of The Deep
05. Mephistopheles

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1965 – The Soothsayer
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Tracklist

01. Lost
02. Angola
03. The Big Push
04. The Soothsayer
05. Lady Day
06. Valse Triste
07. Angola (Alternate Take)

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1966 – Adam’s Apple
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Tracklist

01. Adam’s Apple
02. 502 Blues
03. El Goucho
04. Footprints
05. Teru
06. Chief Crazy Horse
07. The Collector

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1967 – Schizophrenia
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Tracklist

01. Tom Thumb
02. Go
03. Schizophrenia
04. Kryptonite
05. Miyako
06. Playground

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1969 – Super Nova
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Tracklist

01. Super Nova
02. Sweet Pea
03. Dindi
04. Water Babies
05. Capricorn
06. More Than Human

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1970 – Moto Grosso Feio
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Tracklist

01. Moto Grosso Feio
02. Montezuma
03. Antigua
04. Vera Cruza
05. Iska

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1970 – Odyssey of Iska
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Tracklist

01. Wind
02. Storm
03. Calm
04. De Pois Do Amor o Vazio
05. Joy

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1974 – Native Dancer
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Tracklist

01. Ponta De Areia
02. Beauty And The Beast
03. Tarde
04. Miracle Of The Fishes
05. Diana
06. From The Lonely Afternoons
07. Ana Maria
08. Lilia
09. Joanna’s The Theme

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1985 – Atlantis
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Tracklist

01. Endangared Species
02. The Three Marias
03. The Last Silk Hat
04. When You Dream
05. Who Goes There!
06. Atlantis
07. Shere Khan, The Tiger
08. Criancas
09. On The Eve Of Departure

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1986 – Phantom Navigator
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Tracklist

01. Condition Rend
02. Mahogany Bird
03. Remote Control
04. Yamanjia
05. Forbidden, Plan-It!
06. Flagships

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1988 – Joy Ryder
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Tracklist

01. Joy Rider
02. Cathay
03. Over Shadow Hill Way
04. Anthem
05. Causeways
06. Daredevil
07. Someplace Called Where

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1995 – High Life
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Tracklist

01. Children Of The Night
02. At The Fair
03. Maya
04. On The Milky Way Express
05. Pandora Awakened
06. Virgo Rising
07. High Life
08. Midnight In California
09. Black Swan (In Memory Of Susan Portlynn Rome)

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2002 – Footprints Live!
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Tracklist

01. Santuary
02. Masequelero
03. Valse Trist
04. Go
05. Aung San Suu Kyi
06. Footsprints
07. Atlantis
08. Juju

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2003 – Alegria
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Tracklist

01. Sacajawea
02. Serenata
03. Vendiendo Alegria
04. Bachianas Brasileras No.5
05. Angola
06. Interlude
07. She Moves Through The Fair
08. Orbits
09. 12Th Century Carol
10. Capricorn II

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2005 – Beyond the Sound Barrier
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Tracklist

01. Smilin’ Through (Arthur Penn)
02. As Far As The Eye Can See
03. On Wings Of Song
04. Tinker Bell
05. Joy Ryrder
06. Over Shadow Hill Way
07. Adventures Aboard The Golden Mean
08. Beyond The Sound Barrier

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John Coltrane – Stellar Regions

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This set is drawn from a February 15, 1967, recording session–one of John Coltrane’s last days in the studio. The tapes had been in Alice Coltrane’s care since the recording, and she gave titles to the pieces, overseeing their release on CD in 1995. All are previously unreleased with the exception of “Offering” which appeared on Expression. As on that release, there’s evidence here that Coltrane’s relentless musical search was drawing him ever further out. The performances are shorter, focused, with a magisterial lyricism seamlessly integrated with exclamatory shrieks and cries. There is an aching, though rough-hewn, beauty to Coltrane’s playing on these tracks. With the exception of “Tranesonic” where he is on alto, he plays tenor sax throughout. His command of the instrument from the very bottom of the low register to the stratospheric heights of the altissimo is staggering–note in particular his “duet” with himself on “Sun Star” where he questions and answers with himself on the extreme ranges of the horn. There’s a depth and wisdom to these recordings that only further extends the Coltrane legacy.

Tracklist

01. Seraphic Light
02. Sun Star
03. Stellar Regions
04. Iris
05. Offering
06. Configuration
07. Jimmy’s Mode
08. Tranesonic
09. Stellar Regions (Alternate Take)
10. Sun Star (Alternate Take)
11. Tranesonic (Alternate Take)

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Don Cherry – Symphony For Improvisers

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Whether essaying his skittering, free-form variations on cornet, trumpet or pocket trumpet, the endlessly melodic creations of Don Cherry were a triumph of imagination over technique. Cherry was one of the most recognizable improvisers in all of jazz, who overcame his lack of virtuoso chops with melodic and harmonic resourcefulness, terrific swing and a childlike delight in the joy of a toy. There is a playfulness and a sense of discovery to his music–particularly his three masterful sessions for Blue Note–that mitigates the emotional gravity and rhythmic turbulence of his creations.

Symphony For Improvisers , the second work of his legendary triptych, expands upon Cherry’s basic two horns/two rhythm format with the addition of saxophonist Pharaoh Sanders, bassist Jenny Clark and vibraphonist Karl Berger–all masters of the emerging new thing. The results range from flashes of extreme turbulence (the delirious double-time of the title track) to moments of exquisite spiritual serenity (the ecstatic, child-like waltz, “What’s Not Serious”).

Cherry employs a suite form, in which expressive melodic riffs melt into moments of powerful collective improvisation like movements in a symphony. It’s all held together by the unbelievable sound and swing of bassist Henry Grimes and drummer Ed Blackwell, who expand upon the basic time to create powerful conversational forms. Saxophonists Barbieri and Sanders engage in some wild tenor exchanges on “Lunatic” and “Sparkle Plenty,” and Berger’s dancing, polytonal vibes give the ensemble a lush, bell-like dimension without limiting anyone’s harmonic palette.

Personnel: Don Cherry (trumpet, cornet); Don Cherry ; Henry Grimes, Jean-François Jenny-Clark (bass instrument); Pharoah Sanders (piccolo, tenor saxophone); Gato Barbieri (tenor saxophone); Karl Berger (piano, vibraphone); Ed Blackwell (drums).

Tracklist

01. Symphony For Improvisers
02. Manhattan Cry

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John Coltrane – Expression

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John Coltrane’s work with Dizzy Gillespie, Miles Davis and Thelonious Monk, his roots in Charlie Parker and Dexter Gordon, and his mastery of traditional harmony granted him a musical license that other experimentalists such as Cecil Taylor and Ornette Coleman never enjoyed. They were always viewed as musical outsiders, whereas Coltrane’s pedigree was beyond reproach. Which is why John Coltrane’s death on July 17, 1967, a few months shy of his 41st birthday, was such a devastating shock to the jazz community. Coltrane had become a creative lightning rod for the new generation, and his music was synonymous with the liberating energy of the ’60s. Upon his passing, a creative and spiritual void manifested itself, to be filled by cutting edge rockers such as Jimi Hendrix and Cream, and a new generation of electric jazzmen–spearheaded by many of his devotees and his old mentor, Miles Davis.

Coltrane’s swan song, Expression is comprised of two sessions from the winter of 1967. “Ogunde” begins as an ecstatic ballad, with Trane’s cantorish testimonies rising to a fever pitch over wife Alice’s droning chords and Rashid Ali’s feathery brush work. “Offering” begins with keening lyric ideas and rolling rhythms (reminiscent of “A Love Supreme”), alternating with moments of rhythmic abstraction–leading to some electrifying free-form variations with drummer Ali, culminating in a sweeping romantic gesture of uncommon serenity and acceptance.

“Expression” extends on the mellifluous finale of “Offering.” Trane’s stirring prelude sets up Alice Coltrane’s roiling piano solo, until the tenor returns with extravagant, billowing phrases. In closing, the previously unreleased “Number One” offers a clear snapshot of the quintet’s special brand of group improvisation: As the rhythm section feeds their leader a churning stream of sounds and colors, Coltrane works fervently to develop ideas that transcend his beloved chord changes. In the end, there is a note of frustration to this final performance. John Coltrane had run out of time, with much left to accomplish. Listeners should return to “Offering,” and wonder at just how much jubilation John Coltrane left behind.

Tracklist

01. Ogunde
02. To Be
03. Offering
04. Expression
05. Number One

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Roland Kirk – The Inflated Tear

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A landmark album from Roland Kirk, one of his key 60s sides for Atlantic records, and an amazing blend of soul jazz, hardbop, and freer thinking styles! Roland’s playing an insane assortment of horns on the set often at the same time, if you know his 3-way style of blowing and instruments used for the recording include Manzello, stritch, flute, whistle, English horn, and flexatone  in addition to standard tenor and clarinet. Other players in the group include Ron Burton on piano, Steve Novosel on bass, and Jimmy Hopps on drums and the album’s got some incredible original compositions that include “Many Blessings”, “Handful Of Fives”, “Lovellevellioqui”, “Laugh for Rory”, “Black and Crazy Blues”, and “The Inflated Tear”.

Tracklist

01. The Black And Crazy Blues
02. A Laugh For Rory
03. Many Blessings
04. Fingers In The Wind
05. The Inflated Tear
06. The Creole Love Call
07. A Handful Of Fives
08. Fly By Night
09. Lovellevelliloqui

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Pete La Roca – Turkish Women At The Bath

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A “lost” classic of spiritual free jazz, Turkish Women is a charming session inspired by the decadent Ingres painting of the same name. This late 1960s session brought together the fiery, refined tenor sax of John Gilmore; the ruminative acoustic piano of (pre-fusion) Chick Corea; the heavy, hefty-duty bass of Walter Booker; and leader Pete LaRoca. LaRoca, who left music shortly after this 1967 session to devote his time to the art of law, is a contrapuntal percussionist who’s even credited in The Rough Guide to Jazz as “the first person to record a totally free-tempo drum solo.” It’s an ensemble effort, but longtime Sun Ra sideman Gilmore delivers a rare non-Arkestra performance that demonstrates why Coltrane was so clearly influenced by Gilmore’s tightly-controlled, sonic whirlwinds.

Tracklist

01. Turkis Women At The Bath
02. Dancing Girls
03. Love Planet
04. Marjoun
05. Bliss
06. Sin Street
07. And So

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The Crusaders Albums!

In 1961, four fellows from Houston transplanted themselves to Los Angeles and added more distinctly bluesy elements to the soul jazz style with an ear-grabbing album called The Freedom Sound on the Pacific Jazz label. The band, which had been known in turn as the Swingsters, the Modern Jazz Sextet, and the Nighthawks, was now named the Jazz Crusaders. Its four co-leaders were trombonist Wayne Henderson, tenor saxophonist (and occasional bassist) Wilton Felder, pianist Joe Sample, and drummer Nesbert “Stix” Hooper.

The Jazz Crusaders sound caught on big time, and their subsequent Pacific Jazz albums rewarded them with a good deal of exposure. The band performed regularly and got plenty of airplay. One of its signature pieces, the rollickingly fast “Young Rabbits,” was even used as the musical background for a Ford Mustang TV commercial.

But as times changed, so did the Jazz Crusaders. In the late Sixties, they placed such popular numbers as the Beatles’ “Eleanor Rigby” and “Get Back” in their repertoire, and firm backbeats began to bolster many a selection. By 1971, they decided that the word “jazz” kept them from attracting a wider listener base, and so they emerged anew with The Crusaders, Vol. 1 (Chisa), an album that openly infused jazz with pop, soul, and r&b elements.

If the Jazz Crusaders had achieved some degree of popularity, it was nothing like the crossover success that greeted the Crusaders. Such albums as Scratch, Southern Comfort, Chain Reaction, Those Southern Knights, Free as the Wind, Images, Street Life, and Royal Jam (recorded variously for the Chisa, ABC Blue Thumb, and MCA labels) sold well and brought in a deluge of new fans. Street Life’s title track provided the Crusaders with a Billboard top forty hit, reaching no. 36 in 1979.

The Crusaders’ popularity started to fade in the early Eighties, prompted by Henderson’s departure. Hooper then left as well, and by the early Nineties Sample and Felder had disbanded the group. A few years later, Henderson and Felder began performing together, first as the New Crusaders and, more recently, as the Jazz Crusaders.

for more info and buy check: vervemusicgroup.com/crusaders

1961 – Freedom Sound
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Tracklist

01. The Geek
02. M.J.S. Funk (Alternate Version)
03. Coon (Alternate Version)
04. Freedom Sound
05. Theme From “Exodus”
06. That’s It
07. M.J.S. Funk
08. Coon

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1962 – At The Lighthouse
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Tracklist

01. Introduction
02. Congolese Sermon
03. Cathy’s Dilemma
04. Blues For Ramona
05. Weather Beat
06. Scandalizing
07. Appointment In Ghana
08. Penny Blue
09. Boopie

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1962 – Lookin’ Ahead
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Tracklist

01. Sinnin’ Sam
02. Tonight
03. 507 Neyland
04. Till All Ends
05. Tortoise And The Hare
06. In A Dream
07. Big Hunk Of Funk
08. The Young Rabbits
09. Song Of India

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1963 – Tough Talk

Tracklist

01. Deacon Brown
02. Turkish Black
03. Brahm’s Lullaby
04. Boopie
05. Tough Talk
06. No Name Samba
07. Lazy Canary
08. Lonely Horn
09. Brother Bernard

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1964 – Heat Wave
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Tracklist

01. On Broadway
02. Green Back Dollar
03. Close Shave
04. Free Sample
05. Mr Sandman
06. Heat Wave
07. Sassy
08. Theme From ‘The L Shaped Room’
09. Some Samba
10. Stix March
11. Purple Onion

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1965 – Chile Con Soul
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Tracklist

01. Agua Dulce (Sweetwater)
02. Soul Bourgeoisie
03. Ontem A Note
04. Tough Talk
05. Tacos
06. Latin Bit
07. The Breeze And I
08. Dulzura

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1965 – The Thing
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Tracklist

01. The Thing
02. Sunset In Mountains
03. While The City Sleeps
04. White Cobra
05. New Time Shuffle
06. Para Mi Espoza
07. Soul Kosher

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1966 – Live At The Lighthouse ’66
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Tracklist

01. Aleluia
02. Blues Up Tight
03. You Don’t Know What Love Is
04. Miss It
05. ‘Round Midnight
06. Some Other Blues
07. Scratch
08. Doin’ That Thing
09. Milestones

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1966 – Talk That Talk
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Tracklist

01. Walkin’ My Cat Named Dog
02. Studewood
03. I Can’t Believe You Love Me
04. There Is A Time (Le Temps)
05. Hey Girl
06. Uptight (Everything’s Alright)
07. Arrastao
08. Mohair Sam
09. Walk On By
10. 1,2,3
11. The Shadow Do
12. Turkish Black

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1966 – The Festival Album Live Newport & Pacific Jazz Festivals
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Tracklist

01. Introduction
02. Trance Dance
03. Summer’s Madness
04. Young Rabbits
05. Freedom Sound
06. Wilton’s Boogaloo
07. Half And Half

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Sam Rivers – Dimensions And Extensions

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Multi-instrumentalist Sam Rivers is usually identified with jazz’s avant-garde wing, but many of his albums are highly accessible thanks to his use of hard swing and his well-defined themes. Recorded in 1967,Dimensions And Extensions  is one of Rivers’s finest albums ever. It features a group of simpatico musicians including trombonist Julian Priester (later to play with Herbie Hancock’s Mwandishi band), alto saxophonist James Spaulding, and hard bop (later crossover) expert trumpeter Donald Byrd. While much of this set is cerebral and sometimes challenging, Rivers engages the listener with his fervent soloing on soprano and tenor saxes and flute, as well as with his rhythmic urgency.

Personnel: Sam Rivers (flute, soprano saxophone, tenor saxophone); James Spaulding (flute, alto saxophone); Donald Byrd (trumpet); Julian Priester (trombone); Cecil McBee (bass instrument); Steve Ellington (drum).

Tracklist

01. Precis
02. Paean
03. Effusive Melange
04. Involution
05. Afflatus
06. Helix

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Donald Byrd – Slow Drag

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Slow Drag was one of trumpeter Donald Byrd’s final hard bop dates. Teamed with altoist Sonny Red, pianist Cedar Walton, bassist Walter Booker and drummer Billy Higgins (who takes a surprise vocal on the title cut), this quintet outing features originals by Byrd, Walton and Red along with the standards “Secret Love” and “My Ideal.” The music in general finds Byrd looking both backwards toward the blues and forwards toward modal music and hints of the avant-garde. A fine effort.

Tracklist

01. Slow Drag
02. Secret Love
03. Book’s Bossa
04. Jelly Roll
05. The Loner
06. My Ideal

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