Horace Parlan – Happy Frame Of Mind

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Happy Frame of Mind finds Horace Parlan breaking away from the soul-inflected hard bop that had become his trademark, moving his music into more adventurous, post-bop territory. Aided by a first-rate quintet — trumpeter Johnny Coles, tenor saxophonist Booker Ervin, guitarist Grant Green, bassist Butch Warren, drummer Billy Higgins — Parlan produces a provocative set that is grounded in soul and blues but stretches out into challenging improvisations. None of the musicians completely embrace the avant-garde, but there are shifting tonal textures and unpredictable turns in the solos which have been previously unheard in Parlan’s music. Perhaps that’s the reason why Happy Frame of Mind sat unissued in Blue Note’s vaults until 1976, when it was released as part of a double-record Booker Ervin set, but the fact of the matter is, it’s one of Parlan’s most successful efforts, finding the perfect middle ground between accessible, entertaining jazz and more adventurous music. (allmusic.com)

Personnel: Horace Parlan (piano); Booker Ervin (tenor saxophone); Grant Green (guitar); Johnny Coles (trumpet); Butch Warren (bass); Billy Higgins (drums).

Tracklist

01. Home Is Africa
02. A Tune for Richard
03. Back From The Gig
04. Dexi
05. Kucheza Blues
06. Happy Frame Of Mind

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Duke Ellington and Coleman Hawkins – Duke Ellington Meets Coleman Hawkins

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Duke Ellington and Coleman Hawkins were both involved in unusual collaborations in the early 1960s, often with much younger musicians: Ellington with Max Roach and Charles Mingus (Money Jungle) and with John Coltrane; Hawkins with Roach and Sonny Rollins. As surprising as any of those inter-generational sessions, however, is this 1962 meeting between Ellington and Hawkins, if only because it hadn’t happened before. With a band of Duke’s greatest veterans–alto saxophonist Johnny Hodges, baritone saxophonist Harry Carney, trombonist Lawrence Brown, and Ray Nance on trumpet and violin–it’s classic small-group Ellingtonia with one essential difference. “Limbo Jazz” and “The Ricitic,” pulled together for the occasion, are playful tunes with touches of lounge Latin. The latter becomes a delightful dialog focused on Nance’s violin and Hawkins and Ellington’s inspired accompaniment. The finest moments come with “Mood Indigo,” a beautiful vehicle for Hawkins’s warmly rambunctious tenor, and “Self-Portrait of the Bean,” an Ellington-Strayhorn tribute that Ellington only finished in the studio on the day of recording. Rising to the special moment, Hawkins invests the ballad with extraordinary depth and grace. –Stuart Broomer

Personnel: Duke Ellington (piano); Coleman Hawkins (tenor saxophone); Johnny Hodges (alto saxophone); Harry Carney (baritone saxophone, bass clarinet); Ray Nance (cornet, violin); Lawrence Brown (trombone); Aaron Bell (bass); Sam Woodyard (drums).

Tracklist

01. Limbo Jazz
02. Mood Indigo
03. Ray Charles’ Place
04. Wanderlust
05. You Dirty Dog
06. Self Portrait (Of The Bean)
07. The Jeep Is Jumpin’
08. The Ricitic

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Duke Ellington – Money Jungle

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What an alliance: a legendary bandleader and composer, a pioneering bop drummer, and an unclassifiable (and often prickly) bass behemoth. It’s no wonder that the tension between Duke Ellington, Max Roach, and Charlie Mingus is thick and extremely tangible, permeating this breathtaking 1962 album with passion and aggression. On the jagged blues “Very Special,” Ellington establishes a weighty mood while his piano work almost borders on free jazz. Roach’s sticks dance and prance across every inch of his kit on “A Little Max”; on “Caravan” he effectively shifts from exotic rhythms to straight time. Duke’s harmonic invention is delicate and mysterious on “Fleurette Africaine,” but simultaneously jarring and cerebral on the confrontational “Wig Wise.” It’s hard to believe only three people are creating the stomping, disjointed monster that is the title track. Ellington alone emphasizes the beautiful melodies of the classic ballads “Soltitude” and “Warm Valley,” but the edge returns when the rhythm section joins him. Mingus, who actually idolized Ellington, seems to be purposely agitating the master, almost taunting him. You’d say the synergy was magical, except that they seem to be working against each other. –Marc Greilsamer

Tracklist

01. Money Jungle
02. Fleurette Africaine
03. Very Special
04. Warm Valley
05. Wig Wise
06. Caravan
07. Solitude
08. Switch Blade
09. A Little Max (Parfait)
10. REM Blues
11. Backward Country Boy Blues
12. Solitude (Alternate Take)
13. Switch Blade (Alternate Take)
14. A Little Max (Parfait) (Alternate Take)
15. REM Blues (Alternate Take)

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Kenny Burrell & John Coltrane – Kenny Burrell & John Coltrane

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During his final months with Miles Davis’ group, John Coltrane participated in a number of recording sessions for Prestige independently of Davis. This album is but one such recording. In 1958, when this recording was made, Coltrane may have been at his creative peak. During this period, his work began to transcend “bebop” and “cool,” anticipating even more modern developments in jazz-changes that would affect a whole generation of musicians. On Kenny Burrell & John Coltrane, we hear the two jazz masters creating time-honored renditions of tunes such as “Why Was I Born,” a duet that highlights the musicians’ ability to not only savor each note, but to take a rather plaintive composition and develop it organically. Burrell, Coltrane, and company swing “Freight Trane” with great authority, thanks to the drumming acumen of Jimmy Cobb. On this tune, Coltrane uses a variety of sudden flourishes and lyrical lines, while Burrell comps chords in simpatico. Most importantly, this album represents the one-time chemistry of Burrell and Coltrane.

(cduniverse)

Personnel: Kenny Burrell (guitar); John Coltrane (tenor saxophone); Tommy Flanagan (piano); Paul Chambers (upright bass); Jimmy Cobb (drums).

Tracklist

01. Freight Trane
02. I Never Knew
03. Lyresto
04. Why Was I Born
05. Big Paul

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Grant Green – Am I Blue

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Personnel: Grant Green (guitar); Joe Henderson (tenor saxophone); Johnny Coles (trumpet); John Patton (organ); Ben Dixon (drums).

Tracklist

01. Am I Blue
02. Take These Chain From My Heart
03. I Wanna Be Loved
04. Sweet Slumber
05. For All We Know

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Joe Henderson – Our Thing

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The partnership of Joe Henderson and Kenny Dorham yielded a handful of fine sessions for Blue Note in the early ’60s. Among them, Our Thing stands as a particularly excellent testament to their combined brilliance. Henderson’s second date as a leader, Our Thing is part of a triumvirate that includes his first Blue Note date, Page One, and Dorham’s Una Mas, representing the best of the pair’s recorded output of the period. Also sitting in on the session is the eclectic pianist Andrew Hill, who would use Henderson and Dorham on his own landmark date Point Of Departure.

Henderson and Dorham split the writing duties on this disc, with Henderson’s bopping “Teeter Tottter” included in two takes. Dorham’s reflective “Pedro’s Time” is reminiscent of the pastel-colored Latin pieces included on the aforementioned Una Mas. In contrast, Henderson’s blazing title track includes some of the disc’s most virtuoso performances. However, the most substantial track is Dorham’s beautifully crafted “Escapade,” a darkly lit, introspective melody with a melancholy groove that shows how hard bop could still retain its tender side while reflecting the turmoil of the times.

Personnel: Joe Henderson (tenor saxophone); Kenny Dorham (trumpet); Andrew Hill (piano); Pete Roca, Pete La Roca (drums).

Tracklist

01. Teeter Totter
02. Pedro’s Time
03. Our Thing
04. Back Road
05. Escapade
06. Teeter Totter (Alternate Take)

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Kenny Dorham – Una Mas

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Trumpeter Kenny Dorham was a significant presence in the bop and hard bop scenes, a musician whose distinctive, lyrical style had been apparent from his work in the late ’40s with Charlie Parker’s quintet. The year 1963 was especially good for him. He had just returned from a trip to Brazil where he had been absorbing the bossa nova, and he had formed a musical partnership with Joe Henderson, a powerful young tenor saxophonist whose rugged sound and coiling lines were an ideal complement to Dorham’s often subtler approach. This session is the first in a series of dates that would pair the two, and the fifteen minute “Una Mas,” a percolating mix of hard bop sonorities and a samba beat, was the first recorded example of Dorham’s distinctive exploration of bossa nova (his “Blue Bossa” would become a jazz standard).

Personnel: Kenny Dorham (trumpet); Joe Henderson (tenor saxophone); Herbie Hancock (piano); Butch Warren (bass); Tony Williams (drums).

Tracklist

01. Una Mas (One More Time)
02. Straight Ahead
03. Sao Paulo
04. If Ever I Would Leave You

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Jackie McLean – One Step Beyond

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This 1963 album was an exciting, innovative fencemender that drew together the warring factions of the hard boppers versus the avant gardists. Alto saxophonist Jackie McLean’s roots reached back into the Forties where he learned from Bud Powell and Charlie Parker. On this album, he wedded swing with freer musical expression, and introduced four giants to the jazz world: trombonist/composer Grachan Moncur III, vibist Bobby Hutcherson, bassist Eddie Khan, and drummer Tony Williams, who at 17 years of age was a month from joining the Miles Davis Quintet. The music remains fresh and exhilarating to this day driven by a youngster’s masterful, innovative approach to the drums. An alternate take is added to the original album for this Rudy Van Gelder remaster.

Personnel: Jackie McLean (alto saxophone); Grachan Moncur III (trombone); Bobby Hutcherson (vibraphone); Eddie Khan (bass instrument, bass guitar); Toni Williams, Tony Williams (drums).

Tracklist

01. Saturday and Sunday
02. Frankenstein
03. Blue Rondo
04. Ghost Town
05. Saturday And Sunday (Alternate Take)

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Dexter Gordon – Our Man in Paris

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One of the most successful of Blue Note’s ‘blue’ period and an album that remains his finest work. Although his tenor sax occasionally grates, this is a brilliant example of late bebop. Supported by Bud Powell (piano), Kenny Clarke (drums) and Pierre Michelot (bass), the simple quartet sound coolly in control. ‘Willow Weep For Me’ is played with great beauty and ‘A Night in Tunisia’ is yet another well-crafted version. The wonderful bonus of ‘Our Love Is Here To Stay’ and ‘Like Someone In Love’ (from Powell’s Alternate Takes) on the CD reissue puts this album in the first division.

Personnel: Dexter Gordon (tenor saxophone); Bud Powell (piano); Pierre Michelot (bass); Kenny Clarke (drums).

Tracklist

01. Scrapple From The Apple
02. Willow Weep For Me
03. Broadway
04. Stairway To The Stars
05. A Night In Tunisia
06. Our Love Is Here To Stay
07. Like Someone In Love

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Eric Dolphy – Vintage Dolphy

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Eric Dolphy was a composer, arranger and instrumentalist in the vanguard of the new jazz of the early 1960s, leading his own groups and working with John Coltrane and Ornette Coleman. This posthumous collection of some of Dolphy’s rarer, more obscure works gives a fine summation of what he’d done and what he was capable of.

Vintage Dolphy features him in some unusual contexts. A piano-less quartet (“Half Note Triplets”), recalls the Ornette Coleman Quartet of that time, while a freewheeling jam session with a fascinatingly diverse line-up (Don Ellis, Benny Golson, Phil Woods, and Lalo Schifrin), swings the Charlie Parker standard “Donna Lee.” There are several pieces composed by Gunther Schuller (who is equally at home with both jazz and classical music) for small chamber ensembles–these address Dolphy’s interest in 20th century classical music, and his (and Schuller’s) desire to bridge contemporary jazz and classical forms. “Variants on a Theme By Thelonious Monk” is an interesting recasting of Monk’s concepts, with Dolphy’s tart, vocalized horn wailing over a small jazz group and an understated string quartet.

Recorded live at Carnegie Hall, New York, New York on March 14 and April 18, 1963 and live at Everson Museum, Syracuse, New York on March 10, 1962.

Tracklist

01. Half Note Triplets
02. Ode To Charlie Parker
03. Iron Man
04. Densities
05. Night Music
06. Variants on a Theme by Thelonious Monk – Intro & Theme
07. Variants on a Theme by Thelonious Monk – Variant I
08. Variants on a Theme by Thelonious Monk – Variant II
09. Variants on a Theme by Thelonious Monk – Variant III
10. Variants on a Theme by Thelonious Monk – Variant IV
11. Abstraction
12. Donna Lee

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Milt Jackson – In a New Setting

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Milt Jackson made a number of solo albums during his long tenure with the Modern Jazz Quartet is one of his best as a leader. With young pianist McCoy Tyner and tenor saxophonist Jimmy Heath, Jackson puts together a great session, kicking off with his hard driving “Sonny’s Blues.” The leader’s percussive but swinging style, plus the potent solos by Tyner and Heath, are all appealing. The only reservation about this album is the deteriorated condition of the master tape from which it was made; it is rather noticeable on several tracks, though finding a mint copy of the original record is not a viable option for most collectors. Pick this one up in a heartbeat.

Tracklist

01. Sonny’s Blues
02. I’m Gonna Laugh You Of My Life
03. Spanish Fly
04. No Moon At All
05. Slow Death
06. Clay’s Blues
07. Lazy Melody
08. Project S
09. Ev’ry Time We Say Goodbye
10. That’s In
11. Ineffable
12. The Other Half Of Me

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Donald Byrd – A New Perspective

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A New Perspective stands out from most other Blue Note releases of the era. A groundbreaking record in its use of a gospel choir in a jazz setting, it’s unlike anything Blue Note had released before. In addition to the eight-person choir and arrangements by Duke Pearson, Donald Byrd works with a septet that includes pianist Herbie Hancock, guitarist Kenny Burrell, and saxophonist Hank Mobley.

Pearson contributes two compositions, the easily swinging “Chant” and “Cristo Redentor,” a stately, ghostly tune that became a hit on the album’s release. In the arrangements, the choir functions as an instrument, with voices closely recorded, making its presence intimate and palpable. The septet performs beautifully, with Burrell’s guitar and Donald Best’s vibes providing shimmering contrast to the horns on the aforementioned tunes, and on the Byrd originals “Elijah” and “The Black Disciple.” Distinctive and inventive, A New Perspective is a high watermark in Byrd’s discography.

Personnel includes: Donald Byrd (trumpet); Hank Mobley (tenor saxophone); Donald Best (vibraphone); Herbie Hancock (piano); Kenny Burrell (guitar); Butch Warren (bass); Lex Humphries (drums).

Tracklist

01. Eljah
02. Beast Of Burden
03. Crist Redentor
04. The Black Disciple
05. Chant

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Art Blakey Quartet – Jazz Message

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Taking a step outside his Jazz Messengers ensemble, Art Blakey recorded a leisurely session for Impulse! In 1963 with friend Sonny Stitt and the then youngsters McCoy Tyner and Art Davis. Jazz Message, however, is not an insignificant session, but rather a grand documentation of the natural talent of these remarkable artists. Indeed, the session has the feel of a Sunday afternoon jam where four friends have come together to enjoy each other’s company and talents. The group’s loose approach, with little regard for any details save the music, gives the tunes a freshness that is sometimes lacking when arrangements are overly complicated.

From the opening romp of “Cafe” the energy flows freely as Blakey drives the quartet with his powerful drumming. Gershwin’s perennial “Summertime” is given an easy-going swing and provides a pleasant take on the often-overworked standard. Likewise, Tyner’s “Blues Rack” is a simple traditional blues that serves as a springboard for some fine blowing by all. Finally, the always uplifting “The Song Is You” is a gentle swinger that closes the session with a smile that, in the end, is the best message of all.

Tracklist

01. Cafe
02. Just Knock On My Door
03. Summertime
04. Blues Back
05. Sunday
06. The Song Is You

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Jackie McLean – Destination Out

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As the title suggests, there is little about this disc that would constitute a safe approach to jazz. But then, alto man Jackie McLean never was one to take the easy path. The adventurousness of this set from 1963 hints of the changing scene at the time and McLean makes a bold statement here. Included in the adventure are the daring Grachan Moncur III, the equally confident Bobby Hutcherson, and the enterprising Roy Haynes. In all, this makes for a wild ride that opens the door to a new world of possibilities.

The hazy opener, “Love and Hate” sets the tone for the unusual session as the group provides a new standard for group improvisation. Things get stickier with the aptly titled “Esoteric,” a schizophrenic number that alternates from an unsettling waltz to burning bop with expert direction from Haynes. The epic “Kahlil The Prophet” is the disc’s centerpiece and a true masterpiece of modern jazz. The final blues “Riff Raff” ties the session to a close with a constantly repeating melodic motif that increases the tension before opening up to some stunning solo work by all. For those with a sense of adventure, this is the one to get.

Personnel: Jackie McLean (alto saxophone); Grachan Moncur III (trombone); Bobby Hutcherson (vibraphone); Larry Ridley (bass instrument); Roy Haynes (drums).

Tracklist

01. Love and Hate
02. Esoteric
03. Kahlil The Prophet
04. Riff Raff

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Freddie Roach – Mo’ Greens Please

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Housed in one of Blue Note house graphic designer Reid Miles’ most delightful covers — a powder-blue image featuring a nattily-dressed Freddie Roach receiving a heaping helping of the soul food in question — the outstanding Mo’ Greens Please serves as a stepping stone between the more studied soul-jazz of the organist’s label debut Down to Earth and the looser, deeper grooves of the following Good Move! In his liner notes, Roach credits contemporary dance crazes like the Twist, the Hully Gully, and the Bird for inspiring the tempos and moods of Mo’ Greens Please’s ten cuts, while the titular promises of moments like “Party Time,” “Nada Bossa,” and the blistering “Blues in the Front Room” serve further notice of the eclectic menu in store. Though the product of two separate studio sessions, the first featuring the great Kenny Burrell on guitar, for all its stylistic detours the album hangs together beautifully — each of the players is at the top of his respective game, and in particular Roach attacks the organ with all the passion and flair of his most incendiary outings.

Tracklist

01. Googa Mooga
02. Baby Don’t You Cry
03. Party Time
04. Nada Bossa
05. Mò Greens Please
06. Blues In The Front Room
07. I Know
08. Is You Or Is You Ain’t My Baby
09. Unchained Melody
10. Two Different Words

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Hank Mobley – No Room for Squares

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No Room for Squares is one of the more inventive titles in the Blue Note catalog. This is certainly an apt description for a session that includes the very hip Mobley and accompaniment from the swinging Lee Morgan, creative piano master Andrew Hill, sturdy bassist John Ore, and the powerful Philly Joe Jones on drums. Mobley’s confident tenor wail is in full force here, as he and Morgan blow through the all-original program with strong support from the daring rhythm section. Squares is among Mobley’s most raucous sessions. This is evident on energized tracks like the opening title track and the Latin-tinged “Three Way Split.” Also featured is Morgan’s lush ballad “Carolyn.” In all, this is another stunning hard bop classic.

Tracklist

01. Three Way Split
02. Carolyn
03. Up a Step
04. No Room For Squares
05. Me ‘N You
06. Old World, New Imports
07. Carolyn (Alternate Take)
08. No Room For Squares (Alternate Take)

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Freddie Hubbard – The Body & The Soul

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1963′s The Body & The Soul finds a 25-year-old Freddie Hubbard commanding three different ensembles. The first ensemble is a stellar septet that features the sublime Eric Dolphy on alto saxophone and flute and Hubbard’s frequent collaborator, Wayne Shorter on tenor saxophone. One highlight is a gentle and memorable rendition of the classic “Body and Soul,” with Hubbard’s improvisations sliding closely around the well-loved melody. Dolphy’s ethereal flute provides a parenthetical introduction and coda. Where the septet shows Hubbard in familiar light, the larger ensembles show evidence of his young talent ready to blossom.

For the second and third ensembles, Shorter is back, serving as conductor and arranger and expanding into big-band and string arrangements. Though it would seem that such a lineup might heavily favor avant-garde experimentalism, two older standards, “Skylark,” by Hoagy Charmichael, and “I Got It Bad (And That Ain’t Good),” by Duke Ellington, are given reverential treatments. Hubbard’s playing is sensuous and articulate throughout. The Body & The Soul features two of the most formidable players and composers of ’60s and ’70s jazz expanding into new territory, all the while holding true to the music’s rich history.

Tracklist

01. Body and Soul
02. Carnival (Manha De Carnaval)
03. Chocolate Shake
04. Dedicated To You
05. Clarence’s Place
06. Aries
07. Skylark
08. I Got It Bad (And That Ain’t Good)
09. Thermo

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Grant Green – Idle Moments

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The alluring title track alone makes this CD a must-have. A 15-minute dreamscape laid down by pianist Duke Pearson, the song features enchanting solos by tenor saxophonist Joe Henderson and vibraphonist Bobby Hutcherson. Guitarist Grant Green’s single-note melody heightens the song’s suspense. Grant’s original “Jean de Fleur” finds the ensemble in brisker tempo, while their cover of John Lewis’s “Django” exudes the spine-tingling coolness of Lewis’s brand of bop.

Tracklist

01. Idle Moments
02. Jean De Fleur
03. Django
04. Nomad
05. Jean De Fleur (Alternate Version)
06. Django (Alternate Version)

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Bobby Hutcherson – The Kicker

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The same personnel who performed on Grant Green’s classic Idle Moments session in November 1963 reconvened for Bobby Hutcherson’s first recording as a leader one month later. The Kicker, however, was never released and waited more than 35 years to see the light of day. Thanks to reissue king Michael Cuscuna, we are now finally able to hear this swinging disc and marvel at yet another example of Hutcherson’s brilliance. Although this session is a bit more conservative than Dialogue, Hutcherson’s original released debut, this is an exquisite capsule of the Blue Note era and a crisp performance by all. Many of the tunes here have been recorded in various forms by other Blue Note artists, but this ensemble gives each cut its own distinctive treatment. Joe Henderson’s title track and “Step Lightly” are excellent examples of familiar tunes that are given a new flavor by this long-buried treasure of a disc. Also included is an energetic reading of the standard “If Ever I Would Leave You” and Joe Chamber’s “Mirrors,” both of which feature remarkable work by Hutcherson in his early development.

Tracklist

01. If Ever I Would Leave You
02. Mirrors
03. For Duke P.
04. The Kicker
05. Step Lightly
06. Bedouin

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The Crusaders Albums!

In 1961, four fellows from Houston transplanted themselves to Los Angeles and added more distinctly bluesy elements to the soul jazz style with an ear-grabbing album called The Freedom Sound on the Pacific Jazz label. The band, which had been known in turn as the Swingsters, the Modern Jazz Sextet, and the Nighthawks, was now named the Jazz Crusaders. Its four co-leaders were trombonist Wayne Henderson, tenor saxophonist (and occasional bassist) Wilton Felder, pianist Joe Sample, and drummer Nesbert “Stix” Hooper.

The Jazz Crusaders sound caught on big time, and their subsequent Pacific Jazz albums rewarded them with a good deal of exposure. The band performed regularly and got plenty of airplay. One of its signature pieces, the rollickingly fast “Young Rabbits,” was even used as the musical background for a Ford Mustang TV commercial.

But as times changed, so did the Jazz Crusaders. In the late Sixties, they placed such popular numbers as the Beatles’ “Eleanor Rigby” and “Get Back” in their repertoire, and firm backbeats began to bolster many a selection. By 1971, they decided that the word “jazz” kept them from attracting a wider listener base, and so they emerged anew with The Crusaders, Vol. 1 (Chisa), an album that openly infused jazz with pop, soul, and r&b elements.

If the Jazz Crusaders had achieved some degree of popularity, it was nothing like the crossover success that greeted the Crusaders. Such albums as Scratch, Southern Comfort, Chain Reaction, Those Southern Knights, Free as the Wind, Images, Street Life, and Royal Jam (recorded variously for the Chisa, ABC Blue Thumb, and MCA labels) sold well and brought in a deluge of new fans. Street Life’s title track provided the Crusaders with a Billboard top forty hit, reaching no. 36 in 1979.

The Crusaders’ popularity started to fade in the early Eighties, prompted by Henderson’s departure. Hooper then left as well, and by the early Nineties Sample and Felder had disbanded the group. A few years later, Henderson and Felder began performing together, first as the New Crusaders and, more recently, as the Jazz Crusaders.

for more info and buy check: vervemusicgroup.com/crusaders

1961 – Freedom Sound
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Tracklist

01. The Geek
02. M.J.S. Funk (Alternate Version)
03. Coon (Alternate Version)
04. Freedom Sound
05. Theme From “Exodus”
06. That’s It
07. M.J.S. Funk
08. Coon

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1962 – At The Lighthouse
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Tracklist

01. Introduction
02. Congolese Sermon
03. Cathy’s Dilemma
04. Blues For Ramona
05. Weather Beat
06. Scandalizing
07. Appointment In Ghana
08. Penny Blue
09. Boopie

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1962 – Lookin’ Ahead
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Tracklist

01. Sinnin’ Sam
02. Tonight
03. 507 Neyland
04. Till All Ends
05. Tortoise And The Hare
06. In A Dream
07. Big Hunk Of Funk
08. The Young Rabbits
09. Song Of India

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1963 – Tough Talk

Tracklist

01. Deacon Brown
02. Turkish Black
03. Brahm’s Lullaby
04. Boopie
05. Tough Talk
06. No Name Samba
07. Lazy Canary
08. Lonely Horn
09. Brother Bernard

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1964 – Heat Wave
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Tracklist

01. On Broadway
02. Green Back Dollar
03. Close Shave
04. Free Sample
05. Mr Sandman
06. Heat Wave
07. Sassy
08. Theme From ‘The L Shaped Room’
09. Some Samba
10. Stix March
11. Purple Onion

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1965 – Chile Con Soul
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Tracklist

01. Agua Dulce (Sweetwater)
02. Soul Bourgeoisie
03. Ontem A Note
04. Tough Talk
05. Tacos
06. Latin Bit
07. The Breeze And I
08. Dulzura

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1965 – The Thing
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Tracklist

01. The Thing
02. Sunset In Mountains
03. While The City Sleeps
04. White Cobra
05. New Time Shuffle
06. Para Mi Espoza
07. Soul Kosher

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1966 – Live At The Lighthouse ’66
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Tracklist

01. Aleluia
02. Blues Up Tight
03. You Don’t Know What Love Is
04. Miss It
05. ‘Round Midnight
06. Some Other Blues
07. Scratch
08. Doin’ That Thing
09. Milestones

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1966 – Talk That Talk
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Tracklist

01. Walkin’ My Cat Named Dog
02. Studewood
03. I Can’t Believe You Love Me
04. There Is A Time (Le Temps)
05. Hey Girl
06. Uptight (Everything’s Alright)
07. Arrastao
08. Mohair Sam
09. Walk On By
10. 1,2,3
11. The Shadow Do
12. Turkish Black

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1966 – The Festival Album Live Newport & Pacific Jazz Festivals
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Tracklist

01. Introduction
02. Trance Dance
03. Summer’s Madness
04. Young Rabbits
05. Freedom Sound
06. Wilton’s Boogaloo
07. Half And Half

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