Bill Evans – The Interplay Sessions

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During the seven year span at Riverside that launched his career, Bill Evans only twice recorded outside his customary trio format: in the summer of 1962, when he went into the studio in quintet settings involving some of the major jazz artists of the period. The results are combined in this package.

Personnel: Bill Evans (piano); Zoot Sims & His Five Brothers, Zoot Sims (tenor saxophone); Freddie Hubbard (trumpet); Bill Evans (piano); Percy Heath, Ron Carter (bass guitar); Jim Hall (guitar); Philly Joe Jones (drums).

Tracklist

01. You And The Night And The Music
02. When You Wish Upon A Star
03. I’ll Never Sime Again
04. Interplay
05. You Got To My Head
06. Wrap Your Troubles In Dreams (And Dream Your Troubles Away)
07. Loose Bloose
08. Time Remembered
09. Funkallero
10. My Bells
11. There Came You
12. Fudgesickle Built For Four
13. Fun Ride

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Stanley Turrentine – Jubilee Shout!!!

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Jubilee Shout!!! is an album compiled from two sessions recorded for the Blue Note label, the first performed by Turrentine with his brother Tommy Turrentine, Horace Parlan, George Tucker, and Al Harewood in 1961 and a 1962 session with Kenny Burrell added and Sonny Clark and Butch Warren replacing Parlan and Tucker.[2] The 1961 tracks were also issued with additional material from the session as Comin’ Your Way.

Personnel: Stanley Turrentine (tenor saxophone); Tommy Turrentine (trumpet); Sonny Clark (piano); Kenny Burrell (guitar); Butch Warren (bass); Al Harewood (drums).

Tracklist

01. Jubilee Shout
02. My Ship
03. You Said It
04. Brother Tom
05. Cotton Walk
06. Little Girl Blue

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Rahsaan Roland Kirk – We Free Kings

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Only his third session as a leader, 1961′s We Free Kings finds multi-instrumentalist Roland Kirk (he added the Rahsaan in 1969) transplanted to New York from his native Midwest and signed to Mercury Records, where he’d remain for the next seven years. With this classic album, Kirk shook off detractors who dismissed him as a novelty (for his revival of the vaudeville trick of playing up to three reeds at once) and established himself as a paragon of modern jazz.

Beginning with a typically idiosyncratic reworking of Coltrane’s “Blues for Alice,” Kirk only occasionally steps into the free jazz style implied by the album’s title, notably on the first recorded version of his legendary multi-horn showcase “Three for the Festival.” Recorded in two different no-nonsense trio settings, We Free Kings showcases Kirk’s astonishingly varied brilliance in a suitably stripped-down context. (cduniverse.com)

Personnel: Roland Kirk (saxophone, flute); Art Davis (bass); Wendell Marshall (bass); Charlie Persip (drums); Hank Jones (piano); Richard Wyands (piano).

Tracklist

01. Three For The Festival
02. Moon Song
03. A Sack Full Of Soul
04. The Haunted Melody
05. Blues For Alice (Alt. Take)
06. Blues For Alice (Master Take)
07. We Free Kings
08. You Did It, You Did It
09. Some Kind Of Love
10. My Delight

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Lou Donaldson – The Natural Soul

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The Natural Soul finds Lou Donaldson delving deeply into soul-jazz, recording a set of funky, greasy instrumentals with only a few references to hard bop. Donaldson occasionally sounds a little awkward with the relaxed groove of The Natural Soul, as does trumpeter Tommy Turrentine, but the trio of guitarist Grant Green, organist John Patton, and drummer Ben Dixon keep things cooking. Green and Patton’s solos often burn and are always invigorating, and Lou frequently matches their heights. The original compositions — which form the bulk of the album — aren’t much more than blues and soul vamps, but they provide an excellent foundation for the combo to work hot grooves. And, in the end, that’s what The Natural Soul is about — groove. It maintains the high standards Donaldson established with his first soul-jazz foray, Here ‘Tis, and remains one of his best records in that genre. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine

Personnel: Lou Donaldson (alto saxophone); Grant Green (guitar); Tommy Turrentine (trumpet); Big John Patton (organ); Ben Dixon (drums).

Tracklist

01. Funky Mama
02. Love Walked In
03. Spaceman Twist
04. Sow Belly Blues
05. That’s All
06. Nice ‘n Greasy
07. People Will Say We’re In Love

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Chet Baker – Somewhere Over The Rainbow

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Chet Baker’s good looks and somewhat halting delivery made him seem the James Dean of jazz. However, behind the youthful charm and celebrity image of his early years, he was a musician who transcended such sub-genres as “bebop” or “cool.” In fact, Somewhere Over The Rainbow is testament to the fact that Baker’s musical output can’t be easily pigeonholed.

On this 1962 release, we hear the legendary trumpeter on uptempo versions of “Blues in the Closet,” the little-known but cleverly penned Oscar Pettiford tune, and an inventive version of Thelonious Monk’s “Well You Needn’t,” where Baker slowly builds his solo until he explodes into a deluge of ascending and descending chromatic flourishes. Although Baker was much more than just a ballad player, intimate versions of “These Foolish Things” and the title track, “Somewhere Over the Rainbow” add an air of dreaminess to one of Baker’s most distinctive albums of the ’60s.

Personnel: Chet Baker (trumpet); Bobby Jaspar (tenor saxophone, flute); Amadeo Tommasi (piano); Rene Thomas (guitar); Benoit Quersin (bass); Daniel Humair (drums).

Tracklist

01. Well You Needn’t
02. These Foolish Things
03. Star Eyes
04. Somewhere Over the Rainbow
05. Pent-Up House
06. Blues in the Closet

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Bill Evans – How My Heart Sings!

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A new Bill Evans Trio re-entered the studio in the spring of 1962, nearly one year after the untimely death of innovative bassist Scott LaFaro. Chuck Israels was LaFaro’s replacement, and while he would never take musical charge the way LaFaro did, his supportive presence and solid sound helped make this second edition of the Trio a worthy successor. The 1962 dates produced two albums’ worth of material. The previously released Moonbeams was lyrical yet somber, while the altogether brighter How My Heart Sings! consistently swings. There is little evidence here of the depressive slump which caused Evans to take off the previous year in response to LaFaro’s death.

Just as on Moonbeams, we are introduced here to new Evans originals, additions to a growing and impressive catalog, like “Walking Up” and the exhilarating “Show-Type Tune” in which the pianist puts on his best Bud Powell hat, knocking off line after line of thrillingly executed runs. Add Earl Zindar’s haunting title track, then a nod to Dave Brubeck on the two takes of the latter’s “In Your Own Sweet Way” and How My Heart Sings stands as the most varied Bill Evans set since his breakthrough Everybody Digs Bill Evans.

Bill Evans Trio: Bill Evans (piano); Chuck Israels (bass); Paul Motian (drums).

Tracklist

01. How My Heart Sings
02. I Should Care
03. In Your Own Sweet Way (Take 1)
04. In Your Own Sweet Way (Take 2)
05. Walking Up
06. Summertime
07. 34 Skidoo
08. Ev’rything I Love
09. Show-Type Tune

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Piero Umiliani & Chet Baker – Italian Movies

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Contains the Complete Recordings of Piero Umiliani with Chet Bakes in the early 60′s, enjoy!

Tracklist

01. Sentirsi Solo
02. Thinking Blues
03. Tema D’Amore
04. Tensione
05. Smog
06. Improvvisando In Blues
07. Relaxing With Chet
08. Twilight In Los Angeles
09. Furtivamente
10. I Soliti Ignoti
11. Motorizzazione
12. Gassman Blues

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The Modern Jazz Quartet – Lonely Woman

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Having sponsored Ornette Coleman at the School of Jazz near Lennox, MA, pianist and composer John Lewis helped launch the controversial career of one of the last great innovators in jazz. Lewis’ support of the ragtag Texas native was somewhat unique in jazz circles at the time and even surprising, especially considering the gulf between the classical jazz formality of his group the Modern Jazz Quartet and Coleman’s radical notions of free improvisation. Nevertheless, Lewis not only saw in Coleman the first jazz genius since bebop’s Parker, Gillespie, and Monk, but put pay to the praise with the MJQ’s 1962 rendition of one of Coleman’s most famous numbers, “Lonely Woman.” (Along with Art Pepper’s 1960 version of “Tears Inside,” this was one of the earliest of Coleman covers done.) The 1962 Atlantic album of the same name turns out to be one of the band’s best efforts. Lewis and fellow MJQ members Milt Jackson, Percy Heath, and Connie Kaye capitalize on the dramatic theme of “Lonely Woman” while adding a bit of chamber music complexity to the mix. The quartet doesn’t take Coleman’s free form harmolodic theory to heart with a round of quixotic solos, but the group does spotlight the often overlooked strength of his compositional ideas. And while the MJQ further plies its knack for involved pieces on Lewis originals like “Fugato” and “Trieste,” the group also balances out the set with looser material more in tune with Jackson’s blues and swing sensibilities. A great disc that’s perfect for the curious jazz lover.

Tracklist

01. Lonely Woman
02. Animal Dance
03. New York 19
04. Belkis
05. Why Are You Blue
06. Fugato
07. Lamb, Leopard (If I Were Eve)
08. Trieste

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Wayne Shorter Albums!

Though some will argue about whether Wayne Shorter’s primary impact on jazz has been as a composer or as a saxophonist, hardly anyone will dispute his overall importance as one of jazz’s leading figures over a long span of time. Though indebted to a great extent to John Coltrane, with whom he practiced in the mid-’50s while still an undergraduate, Shorter eventually developed his own more succinct manner on tenor sax, retaining the tough tone quality and intensity and in later years, adding an element of funk. On soprano, Shorter is almost another player entirely, his lovely tone shining like a light beam, his sensibilities attuned more to lyrical thoughts, his choice of notes becoming more spare as his career unfolded. Shorter’s influence as a player, stemming mainly from his achievements in the 1960s and ’70s, has been tremendous upon the neo-bop brigade who emerged in the early ’80s, most notably Branford Marsalis. As a composer, he is best known for carefully conceived, complex, long-limbed, endlessly winding tunes, many of which have become jazz standards yet have spawned few imitators.

for more info and buy check: vervemusicgroup.com/wayneshorter

1959 – Introducing Wayne Shorter
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Tracklist

01. Blues A La Carte
02. Harry’s Last Land
03. Down In The Depths
04. Pug Nose
05. Black Diamond
06. Mack The Knife
07. Blues A La Carte (Alternate Take)
08. Harry’s Last Stand (Alternate Take)
09. Down In The Depths (Alternate Take)
10. Black Diamond (Alternate Take)

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1960 – Second Genesis
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Tracklist

01. Ruby & The Pearl
02. Pay As You Go
03. Second Genesis
04. Mr.Chariman
05. Tenderfoot
06. The Albatross
07. Getting To Know You
08. I Didn’t Know What Time It Was

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1962 – Wayning Moments
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Tracklist

01. Black Orpheus (Take 4)
02. Devil’s Island (Take 8 )
03. Moon Of Manakoor (Take 2)
04. Dead-End (Take 8 )
05. Wayning MOments (Take 2)
06. Powder Keg (Take 5)
07. All Or Nothing At All (Take 3)
08. Callaway Went That A Way (Take 3)
09. Black Orpheus (Take 3)
10. Devil’s Island (Take 7)
11. Moon Manakoor (Take 1)
12. Dead End (Take 7)
13. Wayning Moments (Take 3)
14. Powder Keg (Take 1)
15. Callaway Wen That A Way (Take 1)

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1964 – Juju
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Tracklist

01. Juju
02. Deluge
03. House Of Jade
04. Mahjong
05. Yes Or No
06. Twelve More Bars To Go
07. Juju (Alternate Take)
08. House Of Jade (Alternate Take)

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1964 – Night Dreamer
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Tracklist

01. Night Dreamer
02. Oriental Folk Song
03. Virgo
04. Black Nile
05. Charcoal Blues
06. Armageddon
07. Virgo (Alternate Take)

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1964 – Speak No Evil
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Tracklist

01. Witch Hunt
02. Fee-Fi-Fo-Fum
03. Dance Cadaverous
04. Speak No Evil
05. Infant Eyes
06. Wild Flower
07. Dance Cadaverous (Alternate Take)

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1965 – Etcetera
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Tracklist

01. Etceter
02. Penelope
03. Toy Tune
04. Barracudas (General Assembly)
05. Indian Song

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1965 – The All Seeing Eye
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Tracklist

01. The All Seeing Eye
02. Genesis
03. Chaos
04. Face Of The Deep
05. Mephistopheles

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1965 – The Soothsayer
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Tracklist

01. Lost
02. Angola
03. The Big Push
04. The Soothsayer
05. Lady Day
06. Valse Triste
07. Angola (Alternate Take)

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1966 – Adam’s Apple
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Tracklist

01. Adam’s Apple
02. 502 Blues
03. El Goucho
04. Footprints
05. Teru
06. Chief Crazy Horse
07. The Collector

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1967 – Schizophrenia
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Tracklist

01. Tom Thumb
02. Go
03. Schizophrenia
04. Kryptonite
05. Miyako
06. Playground

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1969 – Super Nova
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Tracklist

01. Super Nova
02. Sweet Pea
03. Dindi
04. Water Babies
05. Capricorn
06. More Than Human

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1970 – Moto Grosso Feio
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Tracklist

01. Moto Grosso Feio
02. Montezuma
03. Antigua
04. Vera Cruza
05. Iska

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1970 – Odyssey of Iska
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Tracklist

01. Wind
02. Storm
03. Calm
04. De Pois Do Amor o Vazio
05. Joy

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1974 – Native Dancer
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Tracklist

01. Ponta De Areia
02. Beauty And The Beast
03. Tarde
04. Miracle Of The Fishes
05. Diana
06. From The Lonely Afternoons
07. Ana Maria
08. Lilia
09. Joanna’s The Theme

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1985 – Atlantis
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Tracklist

01. Endangared Species
02. The Three Marias
03. The Last Silk Hat
04. When You Dream
05. Who Goes There!
06. Atlantis
07. Shere Khan, The Tiger
08. Criancas
09. On The Eve Of Departure

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1986 – Phantom Navigator
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Tracklist

01. Condition Rend
02. Mahogany Bird
03. Remote Control
04. Yamanjia
05. Forbidden, Plan-It!
06. Flagships

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1988 – Joy Ryder
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Tracklist

01. Joy Rider
02. Cathay
03. Over Shadow Hill Way
04. Anthem
05. Causeways
06. Daredevil
07. Someplace Called Where

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1995 – High Life
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Tracklist

01. Children Of The Night
02. At The Fair
03. Maya
04. On The Milky Way Express
05. Pandora Awakened
06. Virgo Rising
07. High Life
08. Midnight In California
09. Black Swan (In Memory Of Susan Portlynn Rome)

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2002 – Footprints Live!
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Tracklist

01. Santuary
02. Masequelero
03. Valse Trist
04. Go
05. Aung San Suu Kyi
06. Footsprints
07. Atlantis
08. Juju

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2003 – Alegria
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Tracklist

01. Sacajawea
02. Serenata
03. Vendiendo Alegria
04. Bachianas Brasileras No.5
05. Angola
06. Interlude
07. She Moves Through The Fair
08. Orbits
09. 12Th Century Carol
10. Capricorn II

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2005 – Beyond the Sound Barrier
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Tracklist

01. Smilin’ Through (Arthur Penn)
02. As Far As The Eye Can See
03. On Wings Of Song
04. Tinker Bell
05. Joy Ryrder
06. Over Shadow Hill Way
07. Adventures Aboard The Golden Mean
08. Beyond The Sound Barrier

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Donald Byrd – The Cat Walk

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In this album, Byrd demonstrates a further stage in his career. His sense of dynamics, for instance, is acutely evident throughout the set together with his capacity to construct fresh melodic patterns. Also heartening is the fact that Byrd does not find it necessary to pound home the point that he has roots. A blues feeling courses through everything he plays, but he is also able to range through a much wider variety of moods than are several of his more self-consciously “hard” contemporaries. There is in Byrd a linkage to sunny, light-hearted jazz playing as well as to vigorously assertive self-expression.

Tracklist

01. Say You’re Mine
02. Duke’s Mixture
03. Each Time I Think Of You
04. The Cat Walk
05. Cute
06. Hello Bright Sunflower

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The Bill Evans Trio – Moon Beams

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Moonbeams was the first recording Bill Evans made after the death of his musical right arm, bassist Scott LaFaro. Indeed, in LaFaro, Evans found a counterpart rather than a sideman, and the music they made together over four albums showed it. Bassist Chuck Israels from Cecil Taylor and Bud Powell’s bands took his place in the band with Evans and drummer Paul Motian and Evans recorded the only possible response to the loss of LaFaro — an album of ballads. The irony on this recording is that, despite material that was so natural for Evans to play, particularly with his trademark impressionistic sound collage style, is that other than as a sideman almost ten years before, he has never been more assertive than on Moonbeams. It is as if, with the death of LaFaro, Evans’ safety net was gone and he had to lead the trio alone. And he does first and foremost by abandoning the impressionism in favor of a more rhythmic and muscular approach to harmony. The set opens with an Evans original, “RE: Person I Knew,” a modal study that looks back to his days he spent with Miles Davis. There is perhaps the signature jazz rendition of “Stairway to the Stars,” with its loping yet halting melody line and solo that is heightened by Motian’s gorgeous brush accents in the bridge section. Other selections are so well paced and sequenced the record feels like a dream, with the lovely stuttering arpeggios that fall in “If You Could See Me Now,” and the cascading interplay between Evan’s chords and Israel’s punctuation in “It Might As Well Be Spring,” a tune Evans played for the rest of his life. The set concludes with a waltz in “Very Early,” that is played at that proper tempo with great taste and delicate elegance throughout, there is no temptation by the rhythm section to charge it up or to elongate the harmonic architecture by means of juggling intervals. Moonbeams was a startling return to the recording sphere and a major advancement in his development as a leader.

Tracklist

01. Re:Person I Knew
02. Polka Dots and Moonbeams
03. I Fall In Love Too Easily
04. Stairway To The Stars
05. If You Could See Me Now
06. It Might As Well Be Spring
07. In Love In Vain
08. Very Early

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Eric Dolphy – Iron Man

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Although this 1963 date features some of the same musicians – Bobby Hutcherson, Richard Davis- as the following year’s “Out To Lunch”, it’s nowhere near as elegant as the celebrated Blue Note album.Some might find Eric Dolphy to be a bit forbidding–abstract and explosive in the same measure, and somewhat humorless like his mentor John Coltrane, but without Coltrane’s rhaposdic qualities or pan-world aspect. At the same time, Dolphy’s formidable improvising cuts right through the difficult maze his harmonic concept erects. He rarely gets bogged down in that marginal, beat, occasionally despairing world of the free jazzers. With Dolphy, seriousness can be liberating; he makes being difficult a beautiful way to go, and nowhere as much as this occasionally clunky but richly rewarding session which is the epitome of “post bop.”

Personnel: Eric Dolphy (bass clarinet); Prince Lasha (flute); Clifford Jordan (soprano saxophone); Woody Shaw Jr. (trumpet); Richard Davis (bass); Bobby Hutcherson (vibes); Eddie Kahn (bass); J.C. Moses (drums); Huey Simmons (alto saxophone).

Tracklist

01. Iron Man
02. Mandrake
03. Come Sunday
04. Burning Spear
05. Ode to C.P.

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Freddie Hubbard – Here To Stay

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“Here To Stay” is a fine and early example of Freddie Hubbard, then aged only 24, as a fully formed imaginative voice in jazz. The band – Wayne Shorter (tenor saxophone); Cedar Walton (piano); Reggie Workman (bass); Philly Joe Jones (drums) – offers an ideal platform; all these musicians except Philly Joe Jones were working together at the time with Freddie Hubbard in Art Blakey’s Jazz Messengers and the understanding they had developed shows. But it is Freddie Hubbard’s trumpet playing that really impresses; no wonder that his inventiveness on the instrument is still so admired today. “Here To Stay” is a very welcome addition to the Freddie Hubbard catalogue and is highly recommended.

Tracklist

01. Philly Mignon
02. Father And Son
03. Body and Soul
04. Nostrand and Fulton
05 .Full Moon and Empty Arms
06. Assunta

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Thelonious Monk – Monk’s Dream

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These 1962 recordings were Thelonious Monk’s first for Columbia Records, with whom he spent the most commercially successful years of his career. Mixing his own highly personalized renditions of standards with originals, this was a pattern he followed for all of his subsequent releases with the label. Of his originals, only “Bright Mississippi” had never been recorded before, but after decades of toiling in obscurity, the re-recording of tunes such as “Bolivar Blues” and “Bye-Ya” was most certainly warranted. This is in part because they’d not been heard before by most of his new and wide audience, and also because this quartet (with Charlie Rouse, John Ore and Frankie Dunlop) had been playing at this point for two years–longer than he’d ever been able to keep an ensemble together before–and they’d settled into Monk’s music like one charismatic and multi-limbed being.

Tracklist

01. Monk’s Dream
02. Body and Soul
03. Bright Mississippi
04. Blues Five Spot
05. Blue Bolivar Blues
06. Just a Gigolo
07. Bye-ya
08. Sweet and Lovely
09. Monk’s Dream (Take 3)
10. Body and Soul (Take 1)
11. Bright Mississippi (Take 3)
12. Blue Bolivar Blues (Take 1)

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Max Roach – It’s Time

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An unusual set, this outing featured the drummer’s all-star sextet (which consisted of trumpeter Richard Williams, tenor-saxophonist Clifford Jordan, trombonist Julian Priester, pianist Mal Waldron and bassist Art Davis) joined by a vocal choir conducted by Coleridge Perkinson and orchestrated by Roach (who contributed all six originals). Unlike most other collaborations, the choir was not overly gospel-oriented and was utilized as a sort-of jazz ensemble. Each of the horns has a feature or two and singer Abbey Lincoln stars on “Lonesome Lover.” But despite the sincerity of this effort, there are times when one wishes the choir would leave altogether and let the quintet really stretch out.

Tracklist

01. It’s Time
02. Another Valley
03. Sunny Afternoon
04. Living Room
05. The Profit
06. Lonesome Lover

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Jackie McLean – Let Freedom Ring

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This classic quartet session from 1962 is a quintessential Jackie Mclean disc. Without having to share the front line with another horn, McLean is free to unleash his signature wail in the spotlight with ample support from Walter Davis, Herbie Lewis, and Billy Higgins. Like other McLean sessions of the period, Let Freedom Ring features first-rate compositions whose melodies give way to stirring solos that cover the full range of creative expression.

McLean is in his stride on the opening burner “Melody for Melonae,” which, after a very programmatic beginning, allows the saxophonist plenty of room to cut loose. Davis’s superb piano work on the ballad “I’ll Keep Loving You” provides a delightful backdrop to McLean’s expressive testimonial with wailing screams of emotion. “Rene,” named for McLean’s son, is a quirky tune that offers angular interaction between all members of the quartet and a driving performance by Higgins. Finally, the swinging “Omega” is one of McLean’s most dynamic compositions and closes the session on a stellar high.

Tracklist

01. Melody For Melonae
02. I’ll Keep Loving You
03. Rene
04. Omega

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Eric Dolphy Quintet feat. Herbie Hancock – Complete Recordings

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This rare session marks the sole recording of the collaboration between two of the most innovative composers and musicians in jazz. The quality of this live recordings are poor but i suggest to listen anyway because they are two great musicians.

Tracklist

01. Miss Ann
02. Left Alone
03. G.W.
04. I Got Rhythm
05. 245

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Dexter Gordon – Go

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Just before heading off to a 15-year stay in Europe, the stately Dexter Gordon waxed a pair of records for Blue Note in August 1962: this classic and, two days later, A Swingin’ Affair. It’s been widely reported that Gordon himself considered Go! his greatest achievement, and (if so) it’s easy to hear why. Brimming with conviction and poise, Gordon’s gentle-giant sax carries itself with a sort of graceful edge that is difficult to emulate. He’s always quick with a humorous quote, yet it always seems to fit just right. He’s always languishing behind the beat, yet he never seems late. He possesses an enormous tone, yet he never overwhelms the songs or the listener. He sounds unhurried at any speed. His song selection is typically creative, holding little-known ballads close to his brawny chest like a big, cuddly bear. A stellar rhythm section of the elegantly funky pianist Sonny Clark plus Butch Warren and Billy Higgins doesn’t hurt either.

Tracklist

01. Cheese Cake
02. I Guess I’ll Hang My Tears Out To Dry
03. Second Balcony Jump
04. Love For Sale
05. Where Are You
06. Threee O’Clock In The Morning

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The Crusaders Albums!

In 1961, four fellows from Houston transplanted themselves to Los Angeles and added more distinctly bluesy elements to the soul jazz style with an ear-grabbing album called The Freedom Sound on the Pacific Jazz label. The band, which had been known in turn as the Swingsters, the Modern Jazz Sextet, and the Nighthawks, was now named the Jazz Crusaders. Its four co-leaders were trombonist Wayne Henderson, tenor saxophonist (and occasional bassist) Wilton Felder, pianist Joe Sample, and drummer Nesbert “Stix” Hooper.

The Jazz Crusaders sound caught on big time, and their subsequent Pacific Jazz albums rewarded them with a good deal of exposure. The band performed regularly and got plenty of airplay. One of its signature pieces, the rollickingly fast “Young Rabbits,” was even used as the musical background for a Ford Mustang TV commercial.

But as times changed, so did the Jazz Crusaders. In the late Sixties, they placed such popular numbers as the Beatles’ “Eleanor Rigby” and “Get Back” in their repertoire, and firm backbeats began to bolster many a selection. By 1971, they decided that the word “jazz” kept them from attracting a wider listener base, and so they emerged anew with The Crusaders, Vol. 1 (Chisa), an album that openly infused jazz with pop, soul, and r&b elements.

If the Jazz Crusaders had achieved some degree of popularity, it was nothing like the crossover success that greeted the Crusaders. Such albums as Scratch, Southern Comfort, Chain Reaction, Those Southern Knights, Free as the Wind, Images, Street Life, and Royal Jam (recorded variously for the Chisa, ABC Blue Thumb, and MCA labels) sold well and brought in a deluge of new fans. Street Life’s title track provided the Crusaders with a Billboard top forty hit, reaching no. 36 in 1979.

The Crusaders’ popularity started to fade in the early Eighties, prompted by Henderson’s departure. Hooper then left as well, and by the early Nineties Sample and Felder had disbanded the group. A few years later, Henderson and Felder began performing together, first as the New Crusaders and, more recently, as the Jazz Crusaders.

for more info and buy check: vervemusicgroup.com/crusaders

1961 – Freedom Sound
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Tracklist

01. The Geek
02. M.J.S. Funk (Alternate Version)
03. Coon (Alternate Version)
04. Freedom Sound
05. Theme From “Exodus”
06. That’s It
07. M.J.S. Funk
08. Coon

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1962 – At The Lighthouse
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Tracklist

01. Introduction
02. Congolese Sermon
03. Cathy’s Dilemma
04. Blues For Ramona
05. Weather Beat
06. Scandalizing
07. Appointment In Ghana
08. Penny Blue
09. Boopie

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1962 – Lookin’ Ahead
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Tracklist

01. Sinnin’ Sam
02. Tonight
03. 507 Neyland
04. Till All Ends
05. Tortoise And The Hare
06. In A Dream
07. Big Hunk Of Funk
08. The Young Rabbits
09. Song Of India

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1963 – Tough Talk

Tracklist

01. Deacon Brown
02. Turkish Black
03. Brahm’s Lullaby
04. Boopie
05. Tough Talk
06. No Name Samba
07. Lazy Canary
08. Lonely Horn
09. Brother Bernard

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1964 – Heat Wave
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Tracklist

01. On Broadway
02. Green Back Dollar
03. Close Shave
04. Free Sample
05. Mr Sandman
06. Heat Wave
07. Sassy
08. Theme From ‘The L Shaped Room’
09. Some Samba
10. Stix March
11. Purple Onion

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1965 – Chile Con Soul
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Tracklist

01. Agua Dulce (Sweetwater)
02. Soul Bourgeoisie
03. Ontem A Note
04. Tough Talk
05. Tacos
06. Latin Bit
07. The Breeze And I
08. Dulzura

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1965 – The Thing
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Tracklist

01. The Thing
02. Sunset In Mountains
03. While The City Sleeps
04. White Cobra
05. New Time Shuffle
06. Para Mi Espoza
07. Soul Kosher

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1966 – Live At The Lighthouse ’66
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Tracklist

01. Aleluia
02. Blues Up Tight
03. You Don’t Know What Love Is
04. Miss It
05. ‘Round Midnight
06. Some Other Blues
07. Scratch
08. Doin’ That Thing
09. Milestones

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1966 – Talk That Talk
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Tracklist

01. Walkin’ My Cat Named Dog
02. Studewood
03. I Can’t Believe You Love Me
04. There Is A Time (Le Temps)
05. Hey Girl
06. Uptight (Everything’s Alright)
07. Arrastao
08. Mohair Sam
09. Walk On By
10. 1,2,3
11. The Shadow Do
12. Turkish Black

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1966 – The Festival Album Live Newport & Pacific Jazz Festivals
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Tracklist

01. Introduction
02. Trance Dance
03. Summer’s Madness
04. Young Rabbits
05. Freedom Sound
06. Wilton’s Boogaloo
07. Half And Half

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Art Blakey & The Jazz Messengers – Caravan

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Yet another fabulous session by Art Blakey and his Jazz Messengers from the early ’60s. Caravan was the Messengers’ debut for Riverside during a time when they primarily recorded sessions for Alfred Lion’s Blue Note label. This is the sextet version of the group, with Freddie Hubbard, Curtis Fuller, and Wayne Shorter forming one of the best front lines of all time. As usual, the band is the epitome of classic hard bop, with tight ensemble work, highly advanced arrangements, and powerful solos by all.

The group’s impressive arrangement of Duke Ellington’s “Caravan” opens the set with signature African drum grooves and solos from the leader. Music director Shorter contributes two original selections for the set; his swinging waltz “Sweet ‘N’ Sour” is offered in two takes, and the moving “This is For Albert” is, interestingly enough, a dedication to pianist Bud Powell. One of the group’s strengths, of course, was their treatment of standards, and both “In the Wee Small Hours of the Morning” and “Skylark” receive beautiful readings here. Freddie Hubbard’s classic “Thermo” gets two excellent takes to close the set in true Messengers fashion.

Tracklist

01. Caravan
02. Sweet ‘N’ Sour (Take 4)
03. Sweet ‘N’ Sour
04. In The Wee Small Hours Of The Morning
05. This Is For Albert
06. Skylark
07. Thermo (Take 2)
08. Thermo

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