Charles Mingus – Blues and Roots

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Bassist Charles Mingus was always ready for a good fight. In the liner notes to this disc, Mingus says he wanted to respond to critics who said he didn’t swing enough. And reply he did. Mingus gave whoever these absurd quibblers were some of the most ecstatic blues (“Moanin’” and “Cryin Blues”), gospel (“Wednesday Night Prayer Meeting”), and Dixieland (“My Jelly Roll Soul”) the jazz world has ever heard. Along with his striking original compositions, the instrumental combination in Mingus’s nonet remains unconventional: the frontline included four saxophonists and two trombonists without the counterweight of a trumpeter. The leader’s sliding-octave bass lines and percussive slaps are totally rollicking, and the wild abandon in the group’s playing is irrepressible. –Aaron Cohen

Personnel: Charles Mingus (bass); Jackie McLean, John Handy (alto saxophone); Booker Ervin (tenor saxophone); Pepper Adams (baritone saxophone); Jimmy Knepper, Willie Dennis (trombone); Horace Parlan, Mal Waldron (piano); Dannie Richmond (drums).

Tracklist

01. Wednesday Night Prayer Meeting
02. Cryin’ Blues
03. Moanin’
04. Tensions
05. My Jelly Roll Soul
06. E’s Flat Ah’s Flat Too
07. Wednesday Night Prayer Meeting (Alternate Take)
08. Tensions (Alternate Take)
09. My Jelly Roll Soul (Alternate Take)
10. E’s Flat Ah’s Flat Too (Alternate Take)

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Jackie McLean – Capuchin Swing

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Saxman Jackie McLean’s explorations of free jazz and the avant-garde were still a couple of years away when he cut this Blue Note album in 1960, but that doesn’t mean Capuchin Swing is a by-the-numbers affair by any means. Though its name isn’t generally invoked when the tally of hard bop’s greatest albums is made, it stands up alongside anything Freddie Hubbard, Hank Mobley, et al were doing at the time. With trumpeter Blue Mitchell proving to be a perfectly matched sparring partner, McLean pushes bop harmonies and structures nearly to the breaking point with his intense improvisations on a batch of original compositions with a couple of outside tunes thrown in. Throughout, McLean stirs the sonic pot in such a fiery fashion, you can just tell something’s cooking that he hasn’t quite served up yet. (cduniverse)

Personnel: Jackie McLean (alto saxophone); Blue Mitchell (trumpet); Walter Bishop Jr. (piano); Paul Chambers (bass); Art Taylor (drums).

Tracklist

01. Francisco
02. Just For Now
03. Don’t Blame Me
04. Condition Blue
05. Capuchin Swing
06. On The Lion

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Jimmy Smith – Midnight Special

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The name Jimmy Smith is practically synonymous with jazz organ, and albums such as Midnight Special are part of the reason. Of course, there is Smith’s legendary gospel- and blues-rooted style and brilliant bebop chops, present on Midnight Special in ample doses. Also, one could not ask for a better band: Donald Bailey, one of Smith’s regular drummers; Kenny Burrell on guitar; and Stanley Turrentine on tenor sax. As great as Smith is, it’s Turrentine’s lusciously rich tenor tone and big bluesy honks that makes Midnight Special such a true joy. (Burrell’s burr, elegant guitar isn’t too shabby either.) In the end, this album is simply a party waiting to happen, for fans of Smith and soul-jazz alike.

Personnel: Jimmy Smith (organ); Jimmy Allen Smith (organ); Kenny Burrell (guitar); Stanley Turrentine (tenor saxophone); Donald Bailey (drums).

Tracklist

01. Midnight Special
02. A Subtle One
03. Jumpin’ The Blues
04. Why Was I Born
05. One O’clock Jump

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Nancy Wilson – Something Wonderful

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Nancy Wilson was only 23 years old when this superb album was recorded, yet her soulful, distinctive alto voice sounds as seasoned and sensitive to nuance as a singer twice her age. Overshadowed by the simultaneous release of The Swingin’s Mutual (one of Wilson’s most popular jazz recordings), and overlooked in her subsequent move to the pop and R&B markets, Something Wonderful is a quintessential slice of Wilson’s early–and arguably most significant–work. There is a laid-back, subtle swing to the orchestral work here (courtesy of celebrated big-band arranger Billy May), and Wilson’s readings of the tunes are never overpowered by bombastic playing. Even better is the inclusion of several small-ensemble cuts–like the gently grooving “I Wish You Love,” and the heartbreaking story-song “Guess Who I Saw Today”–which feature Ben Webster on tenor and Jack Marshall on guitar. Through all of this, of course, Wilson’s charming, seemingly off-handed delivery and blues-steeped timbre make each tune float and shimmy with grace. (cduniverse)

Tracklist

01. Teach Me Tonight
02. This Time The Dream’s On Me
03. I’m Gonna Laugh You Right Out My Life
04. I Wish You Love
05. Guess Who I Saw Today
06. If Dreams Come True
07. What A Little Moonlight Can Do
08. The Great City
09. He’s My Guy
10. Something Happens To Me
11. (They Call It) Stormy Monday
12. Something Wonderful Happens

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Donald Byrd – Byrd in Flight

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By the time of this fourth Blue Note album by trumpeter Donald Byrd, it became clear that his playing was becoming stronger with the passing of time. This album features separate studio sessions from January and July of 1960 with constants Duke Pearson on piano and drummer Lex Humphries. Bassists Doug Watkins and Reggie Workman split duties six tracks to three, as do tenor saxophonist Hank Mobley and alto saxophonist Jackie McLean, making for some interesting sonic combinations, although Byrd is the dominant voice. Several of these selections are penned by Byrd, but it is pianist Pearson who contributes four of the most potent compositions on Byrd in Flight, supplying the wings for these quintet recordings to take off with.

Personnel: Donald Byrd (trumpet); Jackie McLean (alto saxophone); Hank Mobley (tenor saxophone); Duke Pearson (piano); Reggie Workman, Doug Watkins (bass); Lex Humphries (drums).

Tracklist

01. Ghana
02. Little Boy Blue
03. Gate city
04. Lex
05. Bo
06. My Girl Shirl
07. Child’s Play
08. Carol
09. Soulful Kiddy

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Sonny Red – Out Of The Blue

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Sonny Red, a fine altoist inspired by Charlie Parker and Jackie McLean, never really made it in jazz, and some of his recordings are rather uninspired. However, that does not hold true for his Blue Note album, which has been reissued on this 1996 CD along with five previously unissued selections. Red, who is joined by pianist Wynton Kelly, either Sam Jones or Paul Chambers on bass, and either Roy Brooks or Jimmy Cobb on drums, never sounded better on records. He performs mostly little-known standards (along with six of his originals) and displays a fair amount of originality and a great deal of potential that was never really fulfilled. Recommended. (allmusic)

Personnel: Sonny Red (alto saxophone); Paul Chambers (bass); Sam Jones (bass); Jimmy Cobb (drums); Roy Brooks (drums); Wynton Kelly (piano).

Tracklist

01. Bluesville
02. Stay As Sweet As You Are
03. I’ve Been In Love Before
04. Nadia
05. Blues In The Pocket
06. Alone Too Long
07. The Lope
08. Stairway To The Stars
09. Crystal
10. Lost April
11. You’re Sensational
12. Blues For Kokee
13. You’re Driving Me Crazy

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Tina Brooks – Back To The Tracks

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Back to the Tracks is an album by hard-bop tenor Tina Brooks recorded in 1960 and released posthumously. The tracks first appeared on a Mosaic 12″ LP (MR4-106) entitled The Complete Blue Note Recordings of The Tina Brooks Quintets. The album was originally intended as BLP 4052, but, for some reason, it was shelved at the time. Only on January 27, 1998, Rudy Van Gelder decided to release the session in its entirety on a remastered Blue Note CD (purple cover, Blue Note 21737), then reissued in 2006 (green cover, BST 84052). Both editions are now out-of-print. A song recorded during the session, “David the King”, was rejected since it “never made it to releasable quality”. Said piece, however, made it to Brooks’ final recording for Blue Note, The Waiting Game.

Personnel: Tina Brooks (tenor saxophones); Kenny Drew (piano); Paul Chambers (bass); Art Taylor (drums); Blue Mitchell (trumpet); Jackie MCLean (alto saxophone).

Tracklist

01. Back To The Tracks
02. Street Singer
03. The Blues and I
04. For Heaven’s Sake
05. The Ruby And The Pearl

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The Incredible Jimmy Smith – Crazy! Baby

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Unlike most of the Jimmy Smith recordings from the era, this CD reissue (which adds “If I Should Lose You” and “When Lights Are Low” to the original LP program) features organist Jimmy Smith’s regular group (rather than an all-star band). With guitarist Quentin Warren and drummer Donald Bailey completing the trio, Smith is heard in peak form on swinging and soulful versions of such tunes as “When Johnny Comes Marching Home,” “Makin’ Whoopee,” “Sonnymoon for Two,” and “Mack the Knife.” Despite claims and some strong challenges by others, there has never been a jazz organist on the level of Jimmy Smith.

Personnel: Jimmy Smith (organ); Quentin Warren (guitar); Donald Bailey (drums).

Tracklist

01. When Johnny Comes Marching Home
02. Makin’ Whoopee
03. A Night In Tunisia
04. Sonnymoon For Two
05. Mack The Knife
06. What’s New
07. Alfredo
08. If I Should Lose You
09. When Lights Are Low

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Tina Brooks – True Blue

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With a strong, smooth tone and an amazing flow of fresh ideas every time he soloed, tenor saxophonist Tina Brooks should have been a major jazz artist, but his legacy is confined to a series of dates that he did for Blue Note as a sideman and leader. “True Blue” is the only album under his own name to come out in his lifetime. He and Freddie Hubbard had recorded Hubbard’s “Open Sesame” a week earlier. Based on these two albums alone, Brooks should have been recognized as an important new voice in jazz. This CD adds to two alternate takes to the original LP.

Personnel: Tina Brooks (tenor saxophone); Tina Brooks; Sam Jones (double bass); Freddie Hubbard (trumpet); Duke Jordan (piano); Art Taylor (drums).

Tracklist

01. Good Old Soul
02. Up Tight’s Creek
03. Theme For Doris
04. True Blue
05. Miss Hazel
06. Nothing Ever Changes My Love For You
07. True Blue (Alternate Take)
08. Good Old Soul (Alternate Take)

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The Three Sounds – Moods

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The Three Sounds open their signature sound a bit on the romantic Moods. They retain the same light touch that made their early albums so enjoyable, but they add more textures to the mix. Light Latin rhythms permeate Moods, from the inventive reworking of Cole Porter’s “Love for Sale” to Harris’ original “Tammy’s Breeze.” Like its predecessor, Feelin’ Good, this record has a bluesy, soulful streak to its personality, as evidenced by the mellow take on “On Green Dolphin Street,” the hep swing of “Loose Walk,” and the infectious cover of Ellington’s “I’m Beginning to See the Light.” Occasionally, the Three Sounds play it a little too cool — while the slow, relaxed “Things Ain’t What They Used to Be” manages to be engaging, “Li’l Darlin’” slows down to a crawl — but on the whole, Moods is an endearing collection of appealing mainstream jazz.

Tracklist

01. Love For Sale
02. Things Ain’t What They Used To Be
03. On Green Dolphin Street
04. Loose Walk
05. Li’l Darlin’
06. I’m Beginning To See The Light
07. Tammy’s Breeze
08. Sandu

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John Coltrane – Coltrane Jazz

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John Coltrane’s work on Atlantic Records marked both his ascent as a leader and the refinement of his trademarked “sheets of sound” improvisational style. This 1961 release features Trane with a variety of celebrated bandmates: pianists Sonny Rollins, Wynton Kelly, and McCoy Tyner, bassists Steve Davis and Paul Chambers, and drummers Lex Humphries, Jimmy Cobb, and Elvin Jones. Stylistically, Trane spans some diverse musical territory. There’s his down-home and hypnotic takes on the blues, “Village Blues” and the Thelonius Monk-like “Harmonique.” Coltrane and his crew poetically and rhythmically remake the standard “My Shining Hour,” and “Like Sonny,” a shout-out to Sonny Rollins, is a dancing Afro-Latin excursion. This date offers a preview of the important music that Coltrane, Tyner, and Jones would unleash in a few years before the saxophonist’s death in 1967.

Personnel: John Coltrane (tenor saxophone); Wynton Kelly, McCoy Tyner, Cedar Walton (piano); Paul Chambers, Steve Davis (bass); Jimmy Cobb, Lex Humphries, Elvin Jones (drums).

Tracklist

01. Little Old Lad
02. Village Bluesy
03. My Shining Hour
04. Fifth House
05. Harmonique
06. Like Sonny
07. I’ll Wait And Pray
08. Some Other Blues
09. Like Sonny (Alternate Take)
10. I’ll Wait And Pray (Alternate Take)
11. Like Sonny (Alternate Take 5)
12. Village Blues (Alternate Take)

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Stanley Turrentine with The Three Sounds – Blue Hour: The Complete Sessions

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Stanley Turrentine & the Three Sounds were initially featured together on an album called Blue Hour, which was a very relaxed and bluesy release. The spaciousness of “I Want a Little Girl” makes the listener savor every note, while “Gee Baby, Ain’t I Good to You” is played with an almost identical tempo and feeling. Gene Harris’ “Blue Riff” picks up the pace a good bit, before “Since I Fell for You” and “Willow Weep for Me” once again slow the proceedings back to a late-night feeling. Turrentine’s tenor sax is in top form, while Harris is the consummate blues pianist in his supporting role. After the first CD reissue of Blue Hour went out of print, it was expanded into a two-CD set by Blue Note, with eight new unissued or alternate takes added on the second disc. It is apparent right away that the original producer Alfred Lion was correct in withholding most of these recordings from release. As well as Turrentine plays during “Blues in the Closet,” the rhythm section seems a bit stiff. Harris’ piano is too much in the background on “Just in Time,” while the pianist’s composition “Blue Hour” doesn’t seem to be fully formed as a blues vehicle. “Strike Up the Band” is the one truly up-tempo recording present on this release, but probably wasn’t issued previously because it is faded prematurely and it was so different from the producer’s concept for the originally conceived release. Regardless, since both Stanley Turrentine and Gene Harris passed away within a year of each other in 2000, having additional music made available featuring these two fine musicians is most welcome.

Personnel: Stanley Turrentine (tenor saxophone); Gene Harris (piano); Andrew Simpkins (bass); Bill Dowdy (drums).

Tracklist

CD1
01. I Want a Little Girl
02. Gee Baby, Ain’t I Good To You
03. Blue Riff
04. Since I Fell For You
05. Willow Weep For Me
CD2
01. Blues In The Closet
02. Just In Time
03. Gee Baby, Ain’t I Good To You
04. Where or When
05. Blue Hour
06. There Is No Greater Love
07. Alone Together
08. Strike Up The Band

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Eric Dolphy – Far Cry

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The complete original album Far Cry (Prestige/New Jazz 8270), featuring Eric Dolphy in a quintet format with another star who passed away before his time, trumpeter Booker Little. Among the many highlights are an outstanding version of the Billie Holiday-Mal Waldron ballad “Left Alone” and Dolphy’s unaccompanied alto sax reading of “Tenderly”. As a bonus, two tunes originally issued under the name the Jazz Artists Guild, both of which were recorded on the same date on November 1, 1960, and each featuring one of the stars of Far Cry: Dolphy on “T’Ain’t Nobody’s Business if I Do”, and Little on “Cliff Walk”.

Personnel: Eric Dolphy (alto saxophone, flute, bass clarinet); Booker Little (trumpet); Jaki Byard (piano); Ron Carter (bass); Roy Haynes (drums).

Tracklist

01. Mrs. Parker Of K.C. (Bird’s Mother)
02. Ode To Charlie Parker
03. Far Cry
04. Miss Ann
05. Left Alone
06. Tenderly
07. It’s Magic
08. Serene

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Art Taylor – A.T.’s Delight

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Despite being a mainstay on many a Prestige and Blue Note session in the 1950s and ’60s, jazz drummer Art Taylor didn’t get much of the spotlight. That makes albums like Delight all the more valuable for lovers of the hard-bop drumming style (i.e., Philly Joe Jones, Max Roach). With the soulful tenor sax of Stanley Turrentine and the clean, spare swing of pianist Wynton Kelly coloring the ride, this disc more than lives up to its title.

Personnel: Art Taylor (drums); Stanley Turrentine (tenor saxophone); Dave Burns (trumpet); Wynton Kelly (piano); Paul Chambers (bass instrument); Carlos “Patato” Valdes (congas).

Tracklist

01. Syeeda’s Song Flute
02. Epistrophy
03. Move
04. High Seas
05. Cookoo and Fungi
06. Blue Interlude

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Stanley Turrentine – Look Out!

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Although he is best known for his bluesy soul-jazz outings, tenor saxophonist Stanley Turrentine’s first Blue Note session as a leader was a much more traditional bop affair, and the resulting album, Look Out!, featuring a rhythm section of Horace Parlan on piano, George Tucker on bass, and Al Harewood on drums, shows as much artful restraint as it does groove. Not that this is a bad thing, since it allows Turrentine’s big, clear tone to shine through in all its muscular sweetness, giving Look Out! a wonderful and flowing coherence. Among the highlights here are the pretty ballad “Journey Into Melody” and the gently funky “Little Sheri.”

Personnel: Stanley Turrentine (tenor saxophone); Stanley Turrentine; George Tucker (bass instrument); Horace Parlan (piano); Al Harewood (drums).

Tracklist

01. Look Out
02. Journey Into Melody
03. Return Engagement
04. Little Sheri
05. Tiny Capers
06. Minor Chant
07. Tin Tin Deo
08. Yesterdays
09. Little Sheri (45 Version)

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Sam Jones – The Soul Society

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Bassist Sam Jones’ debut as a leader resulted in one of his finest recordings, Jones is well featured on bass while the other four numbers find him playing very effective cello. The uncredited arrangements for the groups are uniformly excellent and there is solo space for cornetist Nat Adderley, trumpeter Blue Mitchell, Jimmy Heath on tenor, baritonist Charles Davis, and pianist Bobby Timmons. The repertoire is superior, too, with highlights including the debut of Adderley’s “The Old Country,” a fine jam on “Just Friends,” Keter Betts’ “Some Kinda Mean,” Jones’ bowing on “Home,” and Bobby Timmons’ “So Tired.” Actually all eight selections are memorable on this highly recommended disc.

Personnel: Sam Jones (cello, bass); Jimmy Heath (tenor saxophone); Charles Davis (baritone saxophone); Nat Adderley (cornet); Blue Mitchell (trumpet); Bobby Timmons (piano); Keter Betts (bass); Louis Hayes (drums).

Tracklist

01. Some Kinda Mean
02. All Members
03. The Old Country
04. Just Friends
05. Home
06. Deep Blue Cello
07. There Is No Greater Love
08. So Tired

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Horace Parlan – Speakin’ My Piece

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Another fine jazz pianist from Pittsburgh, Horace Parlan has excelled in styles both straight-ahead (Stanley Turrentine) and edgy (Charles Mingus). He’s a swinging, melodious hard bop player with subtle shades of blues in his approach, which perfectly suits 1960′s Speakin’ My Piece. Piece is a mellow blues-tinged bop quartet session featuring the soulful, agile, massive-toned tenor sound of fellow Pittsburgh expatriate Turrentine. There’s nothing too rambunctious here, just some dandy earthy jazz to relax and unwind to.

Tracklist

01. Wadin’
02. Up In Cynthia’s Room
03. Borderline
04. Rastus
05. Oh So Blue
06. Speakin’ My Piece
07. Rastus (Alternate Take)
08. Oh So Blue (Alternate Take)

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Wayne Shorter Albums!

Though some will argue about whether Wayne Shorter’s primary impact on jazz has been as a composer or as a saxophonist, hardly anyone will dispute his overall importance as one of jazz’s leading figures over a long span of time. Though indebted to a great extent to John Coltrane, with whom he practiced in the mid-’50s while still an undergraduate, Shorter eventually developed his own more succinct manner on tenor sax, retaining the tough tone quality and intensity and in later years, adding an element of funk. On soprano, Shorter is almost another player entirely, his lovely tone shining like a light beam, his sensibilities attuned more to lyrical thoughts, his choice of notes becoming more spare as his career unfolded. Shorter’s influence as a player, stemming mainly from his achievements in the 1960s and ’70s, has been tremendous upon the neo-bop brigade who emerged in the early ’80s, most notably Branford Marsalis. As a composer, he is best known for carefully conceived, complex, long-limbed, endlessly winding tunes, many of which have become jazz standards yet have spawned few imitators.

for more info and buy check: vervemusicgroup.com/wayneshorter

1959 – Introducing Wayne Shorter
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Tracklist

01. Blues A La Carte
02. Harry’s Last Land
03. Down In The Depths
04. Pug Nose
05. Black Diamond
06. Mack The Knife
07. Blues A La Carte (Alternate Take)
08. Harry’s Last Stand (Alternate Take)
09. Down In The Depths (Alternate Take)
10. Black Diamond (Alternate Take)

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1960 – Second Genesis
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Tracklist

01. Ruby & The Pearl
02. Pay As You Go
03. Second Genesis
04. Mr.Chariman
05. Tenderfoot
06. The Albatross
07. Getting To Know You
08. I Didn’t Know What Time It Was

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1962 – Wayning Moments
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Tracklist

01. Black Orpheus (Take 4)
02. Devil’s Island (Take 8 )
03. Moon Of Manakoor (Take 2)
04. Dead-End (Take 8 )
05. Wayning MOments (Take 2)
06. Powder Keg (Take 5)
07. All Or Nothing At All (Take 3)
08. Callaway Went That A Way (Take 3)
09. Black Orpheus (Take 3)
10. Devil’s Island (Take 7)
11. Moon Manakoor (Take 1)
12. Dead End (Take 7)
13. Wayning Moments (Take 3)
14. Powder Keg (Take 1)
15. Callaway Wen That A Way (Take 1)

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1964 – Juju
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Tracklist

01. Juju
02. Deluge
03. House Of Jade
04. Mahjong
05. Yes Or No
06. Twelve More Bars To Go
07. Juju (Alternate Take)
08. House Of Jade (Alternate Take)

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1964 – Night Dreamer
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Tracklist

01. Night Dreamer
02. Oriental Folk Song
03. Virgo
04. Black Nile
05. Charcoal Blues
06. Armageddon
07. Virgo (Alternate Take)

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1964 – Speak No Evil
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Tracklist

01. Witch Hunt
02. Fee-Fi-Fo-Fum
03. Dance Cadaverous
04. Speak No Evil
05. Infant Eyes
06. Wild Flower
07. Dance Cadaverous (Alternate Take)

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1965 – Etcetera
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Tracklist

01. Etceter
02. Penelope
03. Toy Tune
04. Barracudas (General Assembly)
05. Indian Song

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1965 – The All Seeing Eye
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Tracklist

01. The All Seeing Eye
02. Genesis
03. Chaos
04. Face Of The Deep
05. Mephistopheles

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1965 – The Soothsayer
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Tracklist

01. Lost
02. Angola
03. The Big Push
04. The Soothsayer
05. Lady Day
06. Valse Triste
07. Angola (Alternate Take)

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1966 – Adam’s Apple
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Tracklist

01. Adam’s Apple
02. 502 Blues
03. El Goucho
04. Footprints
05. Teru
06. Chief Crazy Horse
07. The Collector

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1967 – Schizophrenia
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Tracklist

01. Tom Thumb
02. Go
03. Schizophrenia
04. Kryptonite
05. Miyako
06. Playground

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1969 – Super Nova
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Tracklist

01. Super Nova
02. Sweet Pea
03. Dindi
04. Water Babies
05. Capricorn
06. More Than Human

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1970 – Moto Grosso Feio
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Tracklist

01. Moto Grosso Feio
02. Montezuma
03. Antigua
04. Vera Cruza
05. Iska

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1970 – Odyssey of Iska
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Tracklist

01. Wind
02. Storm
03. Calm
04. De Pois Do Amor o Vazio
05. Joy

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1974 – Native Dancer
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Tracklist

01. Ponta De Areia
02. Beauty And The Beast
03. Tarde
04. Miracle Of The Fishes
05. Diana
06. From The Lonely Afternoons
07. Ana Maria
08. Lilia
09. Joanna’s The Theme

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1985 – Atlantis
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Tracklist

01. Endangared Species
02. The Three Marias
03. The Last Silk Hat
04. When You Dream
05. Who Goes There!
06. Atlantis
07. Shere Khan, The Tiger
08. Criancas
09. On The Eve Of Departure

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1986 – Phantom Navigator
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Tracklist

01. Condition Rend
02. Mahogany Bird
03. Remote Control
04. Yamanjia
05. Forbidden, Plan-It!
06. Flagships

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1988 – Joy Ryder
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Tracklist

01. Joy Rider
02. Cathay
03. Over Shadow Hill Way
04. Anthem
05. Causeways
06. Daredevil
07. Someplace Called Where

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1995 – High Life
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Tracklist

01. Children Of The Night
02. At The Fair
03. Maya
04. On The Milky Way Express
05. Pandora Awakened
06. Virgo Rising
07. High Life
08. Midnight In California
09. Black Swan (In Memory Of Susan Portlynn Rome)

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2002 – Footprints Live!
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Tracklist

01. Santuary
02. Masequelero
03. Valse Trist
04. Go
05. Aung San Suu Kyi
06. Footsprints
07. Atlantis
08. Juju

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2003 – Alegria
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Tracklist

01. Sacajawea
02. Serenata
03. Vendiendo Alegria
04. Bachianas Brasileras No.5
05. Angola
06. Interlude
07. She Moves Through The Fair
08. Orbits
09. 12Th Century Carol
10. Capricorn II

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2005 – Beyond the Sound Barrier
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Tracklist

01. Smilin’ Through (Arthur Penn)
02. As Far As The Eye Can See
03. On Wings Of Song
04. Tinker Bell
05. Joy Ryrder
06. Over Shadow Hill Way
07. Adventures Aboard The Golden Mean
08. Beyond The Sound Barrier

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Wayne Shorter – Second Genesis

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The second of tenor saxophonist Wayne Shorter’s three Vee Jay LPs, Second Genesis has five of Shorter’s quirky originals plus the obscure “The Ruby and the Pearl” (from a ’50s movie) and a pair of standards. Joined by a particularly strong rhythm section (pianist Cedar Walton, bassist Bob Cranshaw and drummer Art Blakey), Shorter sounds quite distinctive on the advanced hard bop material.

Personnel: Wayne Shorter (tenor saxophone); Cedar Walton (piano); Bob Cranshaw (bass); Art Blakey (drums).

Tracklist

01. Ruby & The Pearl
02. Pay As You Go
03. Second Genesis
04. Mr.Chariman
05. Tenderfoot
06. The Albatross
07. Getting To Know You
08. I Didn’t Know What Time It Was

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Ornette Coleman – This Is Our Music

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This landmark 1960 album from the Ornette Colemen Quartet, continued to hint at the dimension to which Coleman was headed. “This Is Our Music” featured a line-up of Coleman on sax, Don Cherry on trumpet, Charlie Haden on bass, and Ed Blackwell on drums.

With two landmark albums already under its belt, the Ornette Coleman Quartet spent nearly a year out of the studio before reconvening for This Is Our Music. This time, Billy Higgins is replaced on drums by Ed Blackwell, who has a similar knack for anticipating the ensemble’s direction, and proves a more fiery presence on tracks like “Kaleidoscope” and “Folk Tale.” The session is also notable for containing the only standard (or, for that matter, the only non-original) Coleman recorded during his tenure with Atlantic — Gershwin’s “Embraceable You,” which is given a lyrical interpretation and even a rather old-time, sentimental intro (which may or may not be sarcastic, but really is pretty). In general, though, Coleman disapproved of giving up his own voice and viewed standards as concessions to popular taste; as the unapologetic title of the album makes clear, he wanted to be taken (or left) on his own terms. And that word “our” also makes clear just how important the concept of group improvisation was to Coleman’s goals. Anyone can improvise whenever he feels like it, and the players share such empathy that each knows how to add to the feeling of the ensemble without undermining its egalitarian sense of give and take. Their stark, thin textures were highly distinctive, and both Coleman and Cherry chose instruments (respectively, an alto made of plastic rather than brass and a pocket trumpet or cornet instead of a standard trumpet) to accentuate that quality. It’s all showcased to best effect here on the hard-swinging “Blues Connotation” and the haunting “Beauty Is a Rare Thing,” though pretty much every composition has something to recommend it. All in all, This Is Our Music keeps one of the hottest creative streaks in jazz history going strong.

Tracklist

01. Blues Connotation
02. Beauty Is a Rare Thing
03. Kaleidoscope
04. Embraceable You
05. Poise
06. Humpty Dumpty
07. Folk Tale

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