The Red Garland Quintet – All Mornin’ Long

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On November 15, 1957, a quintet headed by pianist Red Garland recorded enough material for two records. This CD reissue (whose companion is Soul Junction) has a 20-minute version of “All Mornin’ Long,” along with briefer renditions of “They Can’t Take That Away from Me” (a mere ten minutes) and Tadd Dameron’s “Our Delight.” More important than the material is that, in addition to Garland, the main soloists are John Coltrane and trumpeter Donald Byrd. Byrd was on his way to getting his sound together, while Trane, very much in his sheets-of-sound period, was already blazing a new path for jazz to follow. An excellent and often quite colorful jam session-flavored hard bop set. ~ Scott Yanow

Personnel: Red Garland (piano); John Coltrane (tenor saxophone); Donald Byrd (trumpet); George Joyner (bass); Arthur Taylor (drums).

Tracklist

01. All Morning Long
02. They Can’t Take That Away From Me
03. Our Delight

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Sarah Vaughan – Swingin’ Easy

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Swingin’ Easy is one of Sarah Vaughan’s lesser known albums for Emarcy, combining two separate trio sessions from 1954 and 1957. The earlier date includes pianist John Malachi (who also worked with singers like Dinah Washington, Billy Eckstine, and Al Hibbler, plus bassist Joe Benjamin and drummer Roy Haynes. Vaughan’s lush ballad technique is in full force in “Lover Man,” “Polka Dots and Moonbeams,” and “Body and Soul,” while she scats in a midtempo setting of “If I Knew Then (What I Knew Now)” and her own “Shulie a Bop.” The second trio include pianist Jimmy Jones, bassist Richard Davis, and Haynes. Aside from a brisk, miniature treatment of “Linger Awhile” and a playful setting of “I Cried for You,” the session is highlighted by a breezy “All of Me.” Vaughan is in terrific form throughout both dates, with the songs mostly running around the three-minute mark.

Tracklist

01. Shulie a Bop
02. Lover Man
03. I Cried for You
04. Polka Dots and Moonbeams
05. All of Me
06. Words Can’t Describe
07. Prelude toa Kiss
08. You Hit the Spot
09. Pennies from Heaven
10. If I Knew Then (What I Know Now)
11. Body and Soul
12. They Can’t Take That Away from Me
13. Linger Awhile

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Charles Mingus – The Clown

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The Clown was Charles Mingus’ second masterpiece in a row, upping the already intense emotional commitment of Pithecanthropus Erectus and burning with righteous anger and frustration. With Pithecanthropus, Mingus displayed a gift for airtight, focused arrangements that nonetheless allowed his players great freedom to add to the established mood of each piece. The Clown refines and heightens that gift; instead of just writing heads that provide launch points for solos, Mingus tries to evoke something specific with every piece, and even his most impressionistic forays have a strong storytelling quality. In fact, The Clown’s title cut makes that explicit with a story verbally improvised by Jean Shepherd (yes, the same Jean Shepherd responsible for A Christmas Story) from a predetermined narrative. There are obvious jazz parallels in the clown’s descent into bitterness with every unresponsive, mean-spirited audience, but the track is even more interesting for the free improvisations led by trombonist Jimmy Knepper, as the group responds to Shepherd’s story and paints an aural backdrop. It’s evidence that Mingus’ compositional palette was growing more determinedly modern, much like his increasing use of dissonance, sudden tempo changes, and multiple sections. The Clown introduced two of Mingus’ finest compositions in the driving, determined “Haitian Fight Song” and the ’40s-flavored “Reincarnation of a Lovebird,” a peaceful but melancholy tribute to Charlie Parker; Mingus would return to both throughout his career. And, more than just composing and arranging, Mingus also begins to take more of the spotlight as a soloist; in particular, his unaccompanied sections on “Haitian Fight Song” make it one of his fieriest moments ever. Mingus may have matched the urgency of The Clown on later albums, but he never quite exceeded it. (allmusic)

Personnel: Charles Mingus (bass); Curtis Porter (alto saxophone-tenor saxophone); Dannie Richmond (drumS); Wade Legge (piano); Jimmy Knepper (trombone).

Tracklist

01. Haitian Fight Song
02. Blue Cee
03. Reincarnation of a Lovebird
04. The Clown
05. Passions of a Woman Loved
06. Tonight at Noon

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Nina Simone – Little Girl Blue

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Little Girl Blue, originally released in 1957, was Nina Simone’s first recording. Backed by bassist Jimmy Bond and Albert Tootie Heath, it showcases her ballad voice as one of mystery and sensuality and showcases her up-tempo jazz style with authority and an enigmatic down-home feel that is nonetheless elegant. The album also introduced a fine jazz pianist. Simone was a solid improviser who never strayed far from the blues.

Tracklist

01. Mood Indigo
02. Don’t Smoke In Bed
03. He Needs Me
04. Little Girl Blue
05. Love Me Or Leave Me
06. My Baby Just Cares For Me
07. Good Bait
08. Plain Gold Ring
09. You’ll Never Walk Alone
10. I Loves You, Porgy
11. Central Park Blues
12. He’s Got The Whole World In His Hands
13. For All We Know
14. African Mailman

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Thelonious Monk – Monk’s Music

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This historic 1957 session, beginning with Monk’s favorite hymn (“Abide With Me”) and ending with the composer’s most affecting ballad (“Crepescule With Nellie”), functions as an overview of his career. As such, Monk’s Music, Thelonious’ fifth album for the Riverside label, is a shot across the bow of the hard bop movement.

A cubist intro by Monk and Wilbur Ware sets the tone for an extended seven-piece rendition of the pianist’s classic “Well, You Needn’t,” with a fiery underpinning by Art Blakey. Monk is at his angular, bluesy best, opening with Charlie Christian-like percussive accents. He grows more taciturn in the second chorus, unleashing some of his most dynamic rhythmic devices before crying out for “Coltrane, Coltrane.” Monk, Ware and Blakey drive Trane relentlessly, and the tenor giant responds with taut, screaming lyricism. Monk responds to Copeland’s Gillespie-ish shouts with child-like glee, then recedes as Blakey ghosts Ware’s dark, driving punctuations before his own polyrhythmic explosion. Coleman Hawkins enters on the crest of a drum roll with operatic fervor, followed by a feline Gigi Gryce, a coy Monk and a final reprise of the theme. A classic moment in jazz.

But Monk’s Music contains numerous highlights. Contrast Hawkins’ elegant, barrel-chested machismo on the ballad “Ruby, My Dear” with Trane’s rendition a year later on Thelonious Monk with John Coltrane. There are two takes of “Off Minor,” one of Monk’s most swinging lines. Hawkins comes off the starting blocks of the master take like a pit bull, Copeland responds in kind, and Monk follows with dissonant shards of counterpoint and harmonic subversion. Coltrane draws first blood on the spooky “Epistrophy,” obviously inspired by Hawkins’ steely melodic focus and Monk’s probing cross-rhythms; Gryce’s solo illustrates his fresh approach to the alto, and Blakey’s solo, with its crushing rolls and extraordinary bent tones, is a masterpiece.

Thelonious Monk Septet: Thelonious Monk (piano); Gigi Gryce (alto saxophone); Coleman Hawkins, John Coltrane (tenor saxophone); Ray Copeland (trumpet); Wilbur Ware (acoustic bass); Art Blakey (drums).

Tracklist

01. Abide with Me
02. Well, You Needn’t
03. Ruby, My Dear
04. Off Minor (Take 5)
05. Epistrophy
06. Crepuscule with Nellie (Take 6)
07. Off Minor (Take 4)
08. Crepuscule with Nellie (Takes 4 and 5)

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Dizzy Gillespie, Sonny Rollins, Sonny Stitt – Sonny Side Up

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Tracklist

01. On The Sunny Side Of The Street
02. The Eternal Triangle
03. After Hours
04. I Know That You Know

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John Coltrane with The Red Garland Trio – Traneing In

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With this session, recorded in the summer of 1957, John Coltrane came out from behind the harmonic safety net of a three-horn frontline to focus on his own imposing gifts as an improviser. As the only horn on Traneing In, the young tenor giant revels in the spotlight, demonstrating some of the hard-won lessons from his long apprenticeship with Thelonious Monk’s group that very summer at New York’s Five Spot club.

Red Garland basks in the cruise-control cool of the Art Taylor/Paul Chambers rhythm team on the title tune, and his jaunty opening chords serve to italicize this blues’ deep, deep groove. When Coltrane enters, the rhythm section ups the ante, from Basie-esque tippling to a driving testimonial. Coltrane’s dense harmonic variations unwind in nervous, compulsive layers of sound. Yet for all his complexity, a fervent preacher’s cry remains at the heart of his every utterance. After a stunning Chambers solo, Garland returns with intricate Bud Powell-like variations and stately, driving block chords which incite Coltrane to further melodic delirium.

Typical of his other Prestige dates, Coltrane carefully contrasts edgy moments of tension with interludes of gentle restraint. Chambers’ sultry opening chords to “Slow Dance” give this ballad an oddly spectral cast, until Trane doubles up on the changes. “Bass Blues” finds the limber Chambers doubling the melody with Coltrane, as Garland and Taylor intersperse witty little asides, while “You Leave Me Breathless” is Coltrane at his most romantic, soaring on angel wings into an expressive upper register. Finally, Coltrane and Chambers roar ahead like…well, like a runaway train, on “Soft Lights And Sweet Music,” as Taylor and Garland hold on for dear life.

Personnel: John Coltrane (tenor saxophone); Red Garland (piano); Paul Chambers (bass guitar); Art Taylor (drums).

Tracklist

01. Traneing In
02. Slow Dance
03. Bass Blues
04. You Leave Me Breathless
05. Soft Lights And Sweet Music

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Johnny Griffin – A Blowin’ Session

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This early date for saxophonist Johnny Griffin is one of his best. In addition to Griffin’s renowned skill and speed on the tenor sax–which is evident throughout 1957′s A Blowin’ Session–the personnel here comprises an almost unbelievable all-star lineup. With Art Blakey’s hard-swinging thunder on the drums, Paul Chambers holding down delicate-yet-complex bass lines, and Wynton Kelly’s bluesy touch on the piano, the rhythm section is simply unbeatable. Add to this young firebrand Lee Morgan on trumpet, and the triple saxophone threat of Griffin, Hank Mobley, and John Coltrane, and you have one of the most talented bands of the hard-bop era.

These musicians existed in the same general orbit–all had played with groups led by Dizzy Gillespie, Miles Davis, or Blakey himself. As expected, they display a marvelous rapport, with plenty of fine interplay, invention, and heat to keep things cooking. The set features two Griffin originals and two standards (“The Way You Look Tonight,” played at breakneck speed, and the lightly swinging “All the Things You Are”). The album is aptly named–Morgan, Coltrane, Mobley, and Griffin are in dazzling form on every track. This hard-bop classic deserves a place in every jazz fan’s library.

Personnel: Johnny Griffin (tenor saxophone); Hank Mobley, John Coltrane (tenor saxophone); Lee Morgan (trumpet); Wynton Kelly (piano); Art Blakey (drums).

Tracklist

01. The Way You Look Tonight
02. Ball Bearings
03. All The Things You Are
04. Smoke Stack
05. Smoke StacK (Alternate Take)

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Ernie Henry – Last Chorus

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Ernie Henry was a promising alto saxophonist who passed away prematurely on December 29, 1957, when he was only 31. He had recorded his album Seven Standards and a Blues on September 30, and four songs for an uncompleted octet date on September 23. This CD reissue has the latter tunes (which feature trumpeter Lee Morgan; trombonist Melba Liston, who contributed “Melba’s Tune”; tenor saxophonist Benny Golson; and pianist Wynton Kelly), an alternate take from the Seven Standards set (“Like Someone in Love”), a leftover track from the preceding year (“Cleo’s Chant”), the solos of Thelonious Monk and Henry (from the lengthy “Ba-Lue Bolivar Ba-Lues-Are”), and an alternate version of “S’posin’” taken from the altoist’s final recording (a quartet outing with trumpeter Kenny Dorham). Overall, the music is fine and, surprisingly, does not have an unfinished air about it. It does make one wish that Ernie Henry had taken better care of his health, as he was just beginning to develop a sound of his own.

Personnel: Ernie Henry (alto saxophone); Sonny Rollins, Benny Golson (saxophone, tenor saxophone); Cecil Payne (baritone saxophone); Kenny Dorham, Lee Morgan (trumpet); Melba Liston (trombone); Kenny Drew, Thelonious Monk, Wynton Kelly (piano); Max Roach, Philly Joe Jones, Art Taylor, Wilbert G.T. Hogan (drums).

Tracklist

01. Autumn Leaves
02. Beauty and The Blues
03. All The Things You Are
04. Melba’s Tune
05. S’Posin’
06. Ba-Lue Bolivar Ba-Lues-Are
07. Like Someone In Love
08. Cleo’s Chant

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Art Taylor – Taylor’s Wailers

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Art Taylor in an all-star sextet of mostly young players comprised of trumpeter Donald Byrd, altoist Jackie McLean, Charlie Rouse on tenor, pianist Ray Bryant, and bassist Wendell Marshall. Among the highpoints of the 1957 hard bop date are the original version of Bryant’s popular “Cubano Chant” and strong renditions of two Thelonious Monk tunes (“Off Minor” and “Well, You Needn’t”) cut just prior to the pianist/composer’s discovery by the jazz public. Bryant is the most mature of the soloists, but the three horn players were already starting to develop their own highly individual sounds. The remaining track (a version of Jimmy Heath’s “C.T.A.”) is played by the quartet of Taylor, tenor saxophonist John Coltrane, pianist Red Garland, and bassist Paul Chambers and is a leftover (although a good one) from another session.

Personnel: Art Taylor (drums); Jackie McLean (alto saxophone); John Coltrane, Charlie Rouse (tenor saxophone); Red Garland, Donald Byrd (trumpet); Ray Bryant (piano); Wendell Marshall, Paull Chambers (bass).

Tracklist

01. Batland
02. C.T.A.
03. Exhibit A
04. Cubano Chant
05. Off Minor
06. Well You Needn’t

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John Coltrane – Blue Train

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Blue Train is one of those ineffable sound recordings that actually seems to capture a moment of perfect artistry. Coltrane was in the midst of a Prestige recording contract but was able to honor a previous commitment to Blue Note and release this one album. With four Coltrane originals, including the haunting theme of the title track, and one standard, this recording showed Coltrane was becoming the complete package: player, composer, and bandleader. What distinguishes this session from the Prestige dates of the same time is the easy, relaxed, and obviously well-rehearsed playing of the group, and the usual masterful recording by Rudy van Gelder. This enhanced CD also features two alternate takes. The well-designed multimedia elements, including musician interviews and pictures from the famous van Gelder studio, round this stellar session into an experience that informs and delights over and over.

Tracklist

01. Blue Train
02. Moment’s Notice
03. Locomotion
04. I’m Old Fashioned
05. Lazy Bird
06. Blue Train (Alternate Take)
07. Lazy Bird (Alternate Take)

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Lee Morgan – City Lights

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Lee Morgan was only a tender 19 years of age when he led this 1957 Blue Note date, but his technique surpassed most of the more seasoned trumpeters on the scene. Technically agile and possessed of a bright, clear tone (he clearly belongs to the lineage of Dizzy Gillespie), Morgan shines on City Lights, and his sidemen–including saxophonist George Coleman, trombonist Curtis Fuller, and bassist Paul Chambers–are no slouches either. Strong writing from jazz composer Benny Golson makes this a thoroughly enjoyable hard bop session.

Personnel: Lee Morgan ; Curtis Fuller, George Coleman, Paul Chambers, Ray Bryant, Art Taylor.

Tracklist

01. City Lights
02. Tempo De Waltz
03. You’re Mine You
04. Just By Myself
05. Kin Folks

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Kenny Burrell/Thad Jones/Frank Wess – After Hours

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This is one of the most exceptional products of the blowing session format Prestige favored in the Fifties. Thad Jones and Frank Wess, with more room than was their nightly lot in Count Basie’s band, are at their best, as is Kenny Burrell (as soloist and rhythm section player); and Mal Waldron, the backbone of Prestige’s session era, provides a perfect setting with four originals and his own playing and organizing skills.

Tracklist

01. Steamin’
02. Blue Jelly
03. Count One
04. Empty Street

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Sonny Rollins – Newk’s Time

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The mid-’50s Blue Note date Newk’s Time is a shining star in the Sonny Rollins catalog. The title is derived from Rollins’ nickname “Newk,” so-called because of his resemblance to baseball player Don Newcomb. It is Rollins’ fierce strength as an improviser, along with his assembled quartet of stellar guests, which makes this session so special. Still in his 20s, the saxophonist displays relentless imagination and fire in lengthy solos on standards like Miles Davis’ “Tune Up” and Kenny Dorham’s rhythmically challenging “Asiatic Raes.”

Rollins also continues his penchant for reinterpreting popular tunes, with a delightful reading of “Wonderful, Wonderful!” and “The Surrey With The Fringe On Top” on which he and Philly Joe Jones play a masterful sax/drums duet. Rollins’ only composition on the disc is his swinging “Blues For Philly Joe” in honor of the legendary drummer who displays his signature style here. Finally, a lightly swinging stroll through Johnny Mercer’s “Namely You” puts the finishing touch on a hard-bop classic.

Personnel: Sonny Rollins (tenor saxophone); Sonny Rollins; Doug Watkins (bass instrument); Wynton Kelly (piano); Philly Joe Jones (drums).

Tracklist

01. Tune Up
02. Asiatic Raes
03. Wonderful! Wonderful!
04. The Surrey With The Fringe On Top
05. Blues For Philly Joe
06. Namely You

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Lee Morgan – The Cooker

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Lee Morgan was a tender 19-year-old when he recorded 1957′s The Cooker for Blue Note. While Morgan wouldn’t truly hit his stride until a few years after this release, his duties as leader here are mighty impressive, nonetheless. A stellar personnel line-up that includes drummer Philly Joe Jones, bassist Paul Chambers, pianist Bobby Timmons, and baritone saxophonist Pepper Adams keeps the musicianship at a remarkably high caliber, and the ensemble’s performance on standards like “A Night in Tunisia” and “Just One of Those Things” sizzle, as do their takes on Morgan’s two originals. The Cooker isn’t a landmark release, but it is a very solid hard-bop outing that showcases dynamic group chemistry and the formative first steps of Morgan’s dazzling trumpet chops.

Tracklist

01. A Night In Tunisia
02. Heavy Dipper
03. Just One Of Those Things
04. Lover Man
05. New-Ma
06. Just One Of Those Things (Alternate Take)

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John Coltrane & Frank Wess – Wheelin’ & Dealin’

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It’s the fall of 1957, and John Coltrane finds himself in another session with overtones of Kansas City, thanks to the inclusion of Basie alumni Frank Wess and Paul Quinichette. Wheelin’ & Dealin’ reprises the Mal Waldron/Art Taylor rhythm section (with Doug Watkins on bass instead of Paul Chambers), only with a bit more bite and jet propulsion than on Trane’s other Prestige all-star dates.

The chemistry between Coltrane, Wess and Quinichette makes Wheelin’ & Dealin’ a particular joy. Listen to the coquettish “Salt Peanuts” vamp Trane and Quinichette introduce behind Wess’ percolating flute on “Things Ain’t What They Used To Be,” and how modern Wess’ conception of this instrument is (rarely has Wess gotten the credit he deserves for his total command of the flute, and for popularizing it in a jazz setting). Quinichette offers witty asides to “Stormy Weather” and Trane answers the old master with steely trills, blues hollers and lines of escalating complexity; Quinichette answers with another quote, this time from “Undecided,” offering a perfect contrast between his own classic lyricism and Trane’s post-modern rhythmic/harmonic mastery. In their round-robin interplay on take 1 of “Wheelin’” Wess seems to split the generational difference.

Illinois Jacquet’s classic big-band number “Robbin’s Nest” offers a cool, laid back setting upon which to essay extended variations; Wess’ flute carries the main melodic thrust, as drummer Art Taylor and Waldron provide sly accompaniment and interplay. Quinichette is up next, and he attacks the theme and changes with taciturn splendor, gradually building tension until he wanders off with bluesy swagger. Trane answers with a magnificent solo, calmly outlining a harmonic sketch of his intentions before vaulting into rhythmically daring variations. The concluding “Dealin’” is a wily after-hours blues by Waldron, who sets a perfect mood on his opening solo, followed by Wess’ piping blues phrases, Quinichette’s elegant pear tones and Trane’s fervent testimony.

Tracklist

01. Things Ain’t What They Used To Be
02. Wheelin’ (Take 2)
03. Wheelin’ (Take 1)
04. Robbins’ Nest
05. Dealin’ (Take 2)
06. Dealin’ (Take 1)

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Benny Golson – The Modern Touch

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Benny Golson’s second album as a leader is a solid hard bop date featuring the tenorman in a quintet with trumpeter Kenny Dorham, pianist Wynton Kelly, bassist Paul Chambers and drummer Max Roach. The all-star group performs three Golson originals (none of which really caught on), a pair of Gigi Gryce tunes (best known is “Hymn to the Orient”) and the standard “Namely You.” Excellent playing on an above-average set that defines the modern mainstream of 1957 jazz.

Benny Golson Sextet: Benny Golson (tenor saxophone); Kenny Dorham (trumpet); J.J. Johnson (trombone); Wynton Kelly (piano); Paul Chambers (bass); Max Roach (drums).

Tracklist

01. Out Of The Past
02. Reunion
03. Venetian Breeze
04. Hymn To The Orient
05. Namely You
06. Blues On Down

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Paul Chambers – Bass On Top

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Paul Chambers cut this little known album for Blue Note in 1957. Those familiar with Chambers’s bass work on straight bop recordings, especially those done with Miles Davis in the 1950s, might be surprised at the range and variety here. Chambers plays the bass as a lead instrument (as the album’s title indicates), and leads a crack ensemble–which includes Kenny Burrell on guitar, Hank Jones on piano, and Art Taylor on drums–through a rousing session of exploratory post-bop. This one comes recommended to collectors, not least for the Rudy Van Gelder remastering.

Personnel: Paul Chambers (bass guitar); Kenny Burrell (guitar); Hank Jones (piano); Art Taylor (drums).

Tracklist

01. Yesterdays
02. You’d Be So Nice To Come Home To
03. Chasin’ The Bird
04. Dear Old Stockholm
05. The Theme
06. Confessin’
07. Chamber Mates

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Tommy Flanagan, John Coltrane, Kenny Burrell, Idrees Sulieman – The Cats

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In 1957, the greatest year for recorded music including modern jazz, Detroit was a hot spot, a centerpiece to many hometown heroes as well as short-term residents like John Coltrane and Miles Davis. It was here that Trane connected with pianist Tommy Flanagan, subsequently headed for the East Coast, and recorded this seminal hard bop album. In tow were fellow Detroiters — drummer Louis Hayes, bassist Doug Watkins, and guitarist Kenny Burrell, with the fine trumpeter from modern big bands Idrees Sulieman as the sixth wheel. From the opening number, the classic “Minor Mishap,” you realize something special is happening. Flanagan is energized, playing bright and joyous melody lines, comping and soloing like the blossoming artist he was. Coltrane is effervescent and inspired, hot off the presses from the Miles Davis Quintet and searching for more expressionism. The other hard bop originals, “Eclypso” and “Solacium,” easily burn with a cool flame not readily associated with East Coast jazz. Flanagan himself is the catalyst more than the horns — dig his soaring, animated solo on “Eclypso” as he quotes “Jeepers Creepers.” The near 12-minute blues “Tommy’s Tune” is the perfect vehicle for Burrell, a prelude for his classics of the same period “All Day Long” and “All Night Long.” The lone trio session, on the standard “How Long Has This Been Going On?,” is regarded as quintessential Flanagan, and quite indicative of the Midwestern Motor City flavor Flanagan and his many peers brought into the mainstream jazz of the day and beyond.

Tracklist

01. Minor Mishap
02. How Long Has This Been Going On
03. Eclypso
04. Solacium
05. Tommy’s Tune

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Art Blakey – Orgy in Rhythm Vol.1&2

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The brainchild of Art Blakey and Blue Note producer Alfred Lion, Orgy in Rhythm Vol.1&2 is a milestone in recorded jazz. Blakey gathered together some of the best jazz drummers and Latin percussionists around for an improvised session in 1957. To this he added renowned flautist Herbie Mann, pianist Ray Bryant and bassist Wendall Marshall for melodic and harmonic support. Make no mistake, however–the focus here is exactly what the title suggests. This is a percussion extravaganza that pushes the drums to the forefront as in the traditional African music that formed the roots of jazz.

Long, hypnotic grooves, wailing chants and grounding bass tones support extended solos by Blakey, Arthur Taylor, Jo Jones and percussionist Sabu. While billed as Blakey’s record, it was certainly a collective effort that brought his rhythmic collages to life. The difficulty in recording such a large ensemble of percussion instruments fell to legendary engineer Rudy Van Gelder, who did a commendable job here; the enormity of the sound must be heard to be believed. Highlight tracks include the wailing “Buhaina Chant,” the expressive “Elephant Walk” and the stunning drum set feature “Split Skins.”

Tracklist

01. Buhaina Chant
02. Ya Ya
03. Toffi
04. Split Skins
05. Amuck
06. Elephant Walk
07. Come Out and Meet Me Tonight
08. Adallah’s Delight

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