Thelonious Monk – The Unique Thelonious Monk

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The seven-song Unique Thelonious Monk (1956) platter was the pianist’s second during his remarkable five-year tenure on Riverside. His debut for the label was the aptly titled Plays Duke Ellington (1955) and once again, on this disc, Monk’s song selection did not feature any original compositions. Rather, the well-chosen standards included exemplify and help further establish the pianist and bandleader within the context of familiar melodies at the head of a trio — consisting of Oscar Pettiford (bass) and Art Blakey (drums). Regarding the personnel, while Pettiford had also accompanied Monk on the Ellington sides, Blakey replaces Kenny Clarke. The trio struts and glides as Monk’s intricate fingering simultaneously displays his physical dexterity as well as his ability to play so deftly in the moment. Both attributes would resurface ten-fold once Monk began to animate his own compositions on the genre-defining Brilliant Corners (1956). (allmusic)

Personnel: Thelonious Monk (piano); Oscar Pettiford (bass); Kenny Clarke, Art Blakey (drums).

Tracklist

01. Liza (All The Clouds’ll Roll Away)
02. Memories Of You
03. Honeysuckle Rose
04. Darn That Dream
05. Tea For Two
06. You Are Too Beautiful
07. Just You, Just Me

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Quincy Jones – This Is How I Feel About Jazz

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The music on this album is from a period when arranger Quincy Jones was a major part of the jazz world, rather than being content just to take bows for it. Six high-quality selections from a 1956 album offer logical, swinging, and often distinct arrangements with plenty of solos from the all-star cast (which includes Lucky Thompson on tenor, altoist Phil Woods, and trumpeter Art Farmer); highlights include “Stockholm Sweetnin’,” “Walkin’,” and “Sermonette.” The remainder of the CD reissues two-thirds of a slightly odd collection led and produced (but not arranged) by Jones. Originally titled Go West, Man, the LP was designed to show off the talents of West Coast arrangers Jimmy Giuffre, Lennie Niehaus, and Charlie Mariano. Three selections feature an alto summit with Benny Carter, Art Pepper, Herb Geller, and Charlie Mariano, and there are also some numbers with a sax section; three songs with a trumpet section had to be left out due to lack of space. Although these performances are enjoyable, it is the Quincy Jones charts that are most memorable, making one regret his decision in the early ’70s to leave jazz altogether. (allmusic.com)

Personnel: Quincy Jones (producer); Art Pepper, Benny Carter, Charlie Mariano, Gene Quill, Herb Geller, Phil Woods (alto saxophone); Jack Nimitz, Pepper Adams (baritone saxophone); Charles Mingus, Leroy Vinnega, Paul Chambers, Red Mitchell (bass); Charli Persip, Shelly Manne (Drums); Herbie Mann, Jerome Richardson (flute, tenor saxophone); Billy Taylor, Carle Perkins, Hank Jones, Lou Levy (piano); Bill Perkins, Buddy Collette, Bunny Bardach, Lucky Thompson, Walter Benton, Zoot Sims (tenor saxophone); Art Farmer, Ernie Glow, Ernie Royal, Joe Wilder (trumpet); Milt Jacksom (vibraphone).

Tracklist

01. Walkin’
02. Stockhold Sweetnin’
03. Evening In Paris
04. Sermonette
05. A Sleepin’ Bee
06. Boo’s Blues
07. Dancin’ Pants
08. Be My Guest
09. King Road Blues
10. Bright Moon
11. The Oom is Blues
12. Ballad Medley: What’s New/We’ll Be Together Again/Time On My Hands/You Go To My Head/Laura

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Dinah Washington – The Swingin’ Miss “D”

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21 track expanded reissue of the complete classic 1956 album The Swinging Miss D, which reunited the vocalist with the arranging talents of Mr. Q himself, Quincy Jones. As a bonus, all of the other tunes from the same sessions (tracks 12 to 14), as well as seven Jazz standards from one of their 1955 dates have been added. Included here are Dinah’s wonderful renditions of ‘Blue Gardenia’ and ‘I’ll Close My Eyes’, both selected by Clint Eastwood for the soundtrack of his movie The Bridges of Madison County. Includes 12-page booklet. Essential Jazz Albums.

Personnel: Dinah Washington (vocals); Barry Galbraith (guitar); Hal McKusick (flute, alto saxophone); Anthony Ortega (clarinet, alto saxophone); Jerome Richardson, Lucky Thompson (clarinet, tenor saxophone); Danny Bank (bass clarinet, baritone saxophone); Don Elliott (trumpet, vibraphone, xylophone, bongos); Clark Terry, Doc Severinsen, Ernie Royal, Joe Wilder, Bernie Glow, Jimmy Maxwell, Nick Travis, Charlie Shavers (trumpet); Jimmy Cleveland, Quentin Jackson, Urbie Green (trombone); Tommy Mitchell (bass trombone); Clarence “Sleepy” Anderson (piano, celesta); Jimmy Crawford , Osie Johnson (drums).

Tracklist

01. They Didn’t Believe Me
02. You’re Crying
03. Makin’ Whoopee
04. Ev’ry Time We Say Goodbye
05. But Not For Me
06. Caravan
07. Perdido
08. Never Let Me Go
09. Is You Is Or Is You Ain’t My Baby
10. I’ll Close My Eyes
11. Somebody Loves Me
12. I’ll Drown In My Tears
13. You Let My Love Grow Cold
14. Bargain Day
15. Relax Max
16. Tears To Burn
17. The Kissing Way Home
18. I Know

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Dinah Washington – Dinah!

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One of many fine EmArcy titles Dinah Washington recorded in the ’50s, Dinah! includes a very enjoyable mix of medium-tempo and after-hours vocal numbers. On a handful of cuts, Washington gets into the kind of smoldering and declamatory blues mode she excelled at, especially on “All of Me” and “There’ll Be Some Changes Made.” Showing her versatility, Washington also shines on relatively tame pop numbers, like the album’s waltz-tempo version of “Look to the Rainbow” and an easy strolling “Accent on Youth.” Even here, her vocal power comes through, albeit with the blues phrasing mostly kept under wraps. On “A Cottage for Sale,” Washington seems to harness all her vocal talents, creating a dazzling mix of jazz phrases, dramatic tonal shifts, and bluesy exclamations, all enveloped in a weary and melancholic tone befitting a breakup song. Besides this gem, other standout selections include “More Than You Know” and “Smoke Gets in Your Eyes.” Hal Mooney provides solid, if not terribly provocative big-band and strings arrangements, with fine solos and obbligato passages coming from former Benny Goodman tenorman George Auld and West Coast jazz luminaries like trombonist Frankie Rosolino and alto saxophonist Herb Geller. Washington’s rhythm section at the time, pianist Wynton Kelly, bassist Keeter Betts, and drummer Jimmy Cobb, provide stellar rhythmic accompaniment throughout. A top Dinah Washington date, and a fine place to start for newcomers to the singer’s catalog. (allmusic)

Personnel: Etta James (vocals); George Morrow (bass); Keter Betts (bass); Jimmy Cobb (drums); Max Roach (drums); Barry Galbratih (guitar); Junior Mance (piano); Richie Powell (piano); Wynton Kelly (piano); Herb Geller (saxophone alto); Cecil Payne (saxophone baritone); Harold Land (saxophone tenor); Jimmy Cleveland (trombone); Clark Terry (trumpet); Clifford Brown (trumpet); Maynard Ferguson (trumpet).

Tracklist

01. Look to the Rainbow
02. Ill Wind
03. A Cottage for Sale
04. All of Me
05. More Than You Know
06. There’ll Be Some Changes Made
07. Goodbye
08. Willow Weep For Me
09. Make Me a Present of You
10. Smoke Gets in Your Eyes
11. I Could Have Told You
12. Accent on Youth
13. What Is This Thing Called Love
14. The Show Must Go On
15. Birth of the Blues

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Paul Chambers – Whims Of Chambers

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Of the seven songs on this Blue Note CD reissue, four are more common than the other three because they contain solos by tenor saxophonist John Coltrane and have therefore been reissued more often. Actually there are quite a few solos in the all-star sextet (which includes the bassist-leader, Coltrane, trumpeter Donald Byrd, guitarist Kenny Burrell, pianist Horace Silver and drummer Philly Joe Jones) and all of the players get their chances to shine on this fairly spontaneous hard bop set. Coltrane’s two obscure compositions (“Nita” and “Just for the Love”) are among the more memorable tunes and are worth reviving. “Tale of the Fingers” features the quintet without Coltrane, the rhythm section stretches out on “Whims of Chambers” and “Tale of the Fingers” is a showcase for Chambers bowed bass. This is a fine effort and would be worth picking up by straightahead jazz fans even if John Coltrane had not participated.

Personnel: Paul Chambers (bass); John Coltrane (tenor saxophone); Donald Byrd (trumpet); Horace Silver (piano); Kenny Burrell (guitar); Philly Joe Jones (drums).

Tracklist

01. Omicron
02. Whims Of Chambers
03. Nita
04. We Six
05. Dear Ann
06. Tale Of The Fingers
07. Just For Love

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Charles Mingus – Pithecanthropus Erectus

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One of the great figures in modern jazz, bassist Charles Mingus was the ultimate triple threat: a master of his instrument, a jazz composer of the first rank, and an insightful leader of a series of extraordinary and incendiary bands. Raised in Los Angeles, Mingus was a devotee of Duke Ellington, whose compositional style had an unsurpassed effect on the young composer. As a player, however, Mingus was drawn to his contemporaries, who included Thelonious Monk, Bud Powell, Charlie Parker, and Max Roach (indeed, Roach and Mingus co-owned their own Debut Records during the ’50s). Perhaps his greatest contribution was bridging the gap between those two generations: in Mingus’s music, one could always explicitly hear the continuity between the big bands and the bebop era, the affinity between the romantic and the modern. Although he had recorded extensively for numerous labels including his own Debut Records, Mingus’s relationship with Atlantic would yield many of his greatest recordings. Cut in 1956, Pithecanthropus Erectus was his first date for the label, and it provided something of a breakthrough for Mingus in his use of extended compositions: the 10-minute title track, and the lovely “Profile of Jackie,” are among the bassist’s finest recordings. The band is notable for the inclusion of the under-recorded tenor saxophonist J.R. Monterose.

Personnel: Charles Mingus (acoustic bass); Jackie McLean (alto saxophone); J.R. Montrose (tenor saxophone); Mal Waldron (piano); Willie Jones (drums).

Tracklist

01. Pithecanthropus Erectus
02. A Foggy Day
03. Profile Of Jackie
04. Love Chant

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Chet Baker & Art Pepper – Playboys

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These Halloween 1956 sides originally appeared as Playboys in 1961 on Pacific Jazz. Myth and rumor persist that, under legal advice from the publisher of a similarly named magazine, the collection would have to be retitled. When the CD version of the same material was issued in the early ’90s, it had been accurately christened Picture of Heath — as more than half of the tracks are Jimmy Heath compositions. Since then, a CD version sporting the original provocative ’50s pinup cover and the name Playboys has also surfaced. Regardless of title, however, the music is the absolute same. These are the third sessions to feature the dynamic duo of Art Pepper (alto sax) and Chet Baker (trumpet). Their other two meetings had produced unequivocal successes. The first was during a brief July 1956 session at the Forum Theater in L.A. Baker joined forces with Pepper’s sextet, ultimately netting material for the disc Route. Exactly three months to the day later, Pepper and Baker reconvened to record tracks for the Chet Baker Big Band album. The quartet supporting Baker and Pepper on Playboys includes Curtis Counce (bass), Phil Urso (tenor sax), Carl Perkins (piano), and Larance Marable (drums). Baker and Pepper have an instinctual rapport that yields outstanding interplay. The harmony constant throughout the practically inseparable lines that Baker weaves with Pepper drives the bop throughout the slinky “For Minors Only.” The soloists take subtle cues directly off each other, with considerable contributions from Perkins, Counce, and Marable. With the notorious track record both Baker and Pepper had regarding other decidedly less successful duets, it is unfortunate that more recordings do not exist that captured their special bond. These thoroughly enjoyable and often high-energy sides are perfect for bop connoisseurs as well as mainstream jazz listeners.

Personnel: Chet Baker (trumpet); Art Pepper (alto saxophone); Phil Urso (tenor saxophone); Carl Perkins (piano); Larance Marable (drums).

Tracklist

01. For Minors Only
02. Minor Yours
03. Resonant Emotions
04. Tynan Tyme
05. Picture Of Heath
06. For Miles and Miles
07. C.T.A.

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Thad Jones – The Magnificent Thad Jones

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This is a 1956 set by bop trumpeter Thad Jones, with an all-star small combo anchored by drummer Max Roach. The late Thad Jones is of jazz’s royal Jones family, which also includes brothers Hank (piano) and Elvin (drums). A fine trumpeter/flugelhornist (with a distinctively big, mellow tone) and an imaginative composer and engaging arranger, Jones made a name for himself with Charles Mingus and Count Basie. He would also co-lead one of the finest big bands of the 1960′s and ’70′s, the Thad Jones/Mel Lewis Orchestra. But in the ’50s, he helmed some fine hard bop sessions for Blue Note, and Magnificent lives up to its title. With the accompaniment of the superbly subtle drumming of Max Roach and piano by Detroit bop icon Barry Harris, one should require little else when seeking classic Blue Note bop-ery.

Personnel: Thad Jones (trumpet); Kenny Burrell (guitar); Billy Mitchell (tenor saxophone); Barry Harris (piano); Percy Heath (bass guitar); Max Roach (drums).

Tracklist

01. April In Paris
02. Billie-dOO
03. If I Love Again
04. If Someone Had Told Me
05. Thedia
06. I’ve Got A Crush On You
07. Something To Remember You By

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Bill Evans – New Jazz Conceptions

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This groundbreaking recording was the first to feature then-unknown Bill Evans as a leader, and it also introduced a trio format of piano, bass, and drums, which would become Evans’s standard format for playing and recording. New Jazz Conceptions, recorded when Evans was just 26, merges his articulate, vigorous playing with the music of fellow Tony Scott Quartet musicians Teddy Kotick on bass and the extroverted Paul Motian on drums. The album’s four original compositions include “Five,” a witty, complicated song which makes clever use of the chords from “I Got Rhythm,” and the disjointed, slightly off-kilter “Displacement,” a study in a common Evans theme of playing against the meter and around the beat of a composition. The most remarkable material is the wonderfully eloquent piano solo, “Waltz for Debby,” written for Evans’s niece, which became perhaps the most renowned classic of his musical career.

Tracklist

01. I Love You
02. Five
03. I Got It Bad and That Ain’t Good
04. Conception
05. Easy Living
06. Displacement
07. Speak Low
08. Waltz For Debby
09. Our Delight
10. My Romance
11. No Cover, No Minimum (Take 1)
12. No Cover, No Minimum

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Art Blakey & The Jazz Messengers – Hard Bop

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The second edition of Art Blakey’s Jazz Messengers, which features altoist Jackie McLean and trumpeter Bill Hardman, tends to get overlooked due to the original version having Horace Silver and the 1959 band featuring Lee Morgan, Benny Golson, and Bobby Timmons. Pianist Sam Dockery and bassist Spanky DeBrest, although destined to be obscure, handle their roles well behind the lead voices even if McLean, Hardman, and Blakey generally steal the show. An excellent hard bop set.

Tracklist

01. Cranky Spanky
02. Stella by Starlight
03. My Heart Stood Still
04. Little Melonae
05. Stanley’s Stiff Chickens
06. Nica’s Tempo
07. Dee’s Dilemma
08. Just For Marty
09. Gershwin Medley (Rhapsody In Blue – Summertime – Someone To Watch Over Me – The Man I Love)

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Donald Byrd & Kenny Burrell – All Night Long

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One of the great jam session recordings of the 1950s, All Night Long was under the releaxed direcions of Kenny Burell. The guitarist gathered together some of the finest young players on the New York scene, including Donald Byrd on trumpet and tenor saxophonists Hank Mobley and Jerome Richardsom, one of the unsung heroes of the flute in jazz. Mal Waldron, Doug Watkins, and Arthur Taylor were the rhythm section. The musical formats were uncomplicated; All Night Long a blues with a brdige, Waldron’s Flickers a 16-bar pattern, Mobley’s two originals based on famliar 32-bar chord sequences. (The CD includes 2 bonus tracks). From these simple,classic bases were launched performances with the hallmarks that have long identified any Burell project: relaxation, swing, and high standards of musicianship.

Tracklist

01. All Night Long
02. Boo-Lu
03. Flickers
04. Li’l Hankie
05. Body & Soul
06. Tune Up

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Horace Silver Quintet – Six Pieces Of Silver

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The Horace Silver Blue Note catalog would not be complete without Six Pieces Of Silver, a session that put the pianist on the map as a leader. After leaving the Jazz Messengers to Art Blakey, this session gave Silver a solid foothold as a solo hard bop contender, as witnessed by the ultra-funky “Senor Blues.” Though his classic quintet was a few years off, SIX PIECES features many of Silver’s Messengers cohorts including Donald Byrd, Hank Mobley, Doug Watkins, and the drummer that best suited the funky pianist, Louis Hayes.

The session gets off to a rocking start with “Cool Eyes,” a swinging testament to Silver’s writing and arranging strengths. Switching gears drastically, the somber ballad “Shirl” is one of his most introspective works. The often-covered hit “Senor Blues” is presented here in three versions: the regular album-length take, a shorter single version, and a vocal rendition by singer Bill Henderson, who was then a newcomer on the New York scene. The only standard of the set, the classic “For Heaven’s Sake,” is a touching ballad that remains a favorite of many pianists, and Silver performs it here with his usual superb taste.

Personnel: Horace Silver (piano); Bill Henderson (vocals); Hank Mobley, Junior Cook (tenor saxophone); Donald Byrd (trumpet); Doug Watkins, Gene Taylor (bass); Louis Hayes (drums).

Tracklist

01. Cool Eyes
02. Shirl
03. Camouflage
04. Enchantment
05. Senor Blues
06. Virgo
07. For Heaven’s Sake
08. Senor Blues (Alternate 45 Take)
09. Tippin’
10. Senor Blues (Vocal Version)

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Sun Ra and the Arkestra – Sound of Joy

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This reissue, prior to the release of many of Sun Ra’s Saturn albums on Evidence CDs, was often thought of as Ra’s second recording although now several earlier dates have appeared. The music from Sun Ra’s Chicago-based band of the 1950s (some of the same tunes, but different performances, also appear on Evidence’s Planet Earth/Low Ways) is quite interesting for its ties to the bop and swing traditions are much more obvious than it would be in the near future. Ra’s eccentric piano and occasional electric keyboard look forward as do some of the harmonies and Jim Herndon’s colorful tympani. Two previously unissued cuts (other versions of which have also surfaced on an Evidence set) augment the original LP program.

Tracklist

01. El Is A Sound Of You
02. Overtones Of A China
03. Two Tones
04. Paradise
05. Planet Earth
06. Ankh
07. Saturn
08. Reflections In Blue
09. El Viktor
10. As You Once Were
11. Dreams Come True

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Sonny Rollins Quartet – Tenor Madness

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At a time when he was a member of the legendary Clifford Brown/Max Roach sextet, Sonny Rollins was still the apple fallen not too far from the tree of Miles Davis. Tenor Madness was the recording that, once and for all, established Newk as one of the premier tenor saxophonists, an accolade that in retrospect, has continued through six full decades and gives an indication why a young Rollins was so well liked, as his fluency, whimsical nature, and solid construct of melodies and solos gave him the title of the next Coleman Hawkins or Lester Young of mainstream jazz. With the team of pianist Red Garland, bassist Paul Chambers, and drummer Philly Joe Jones, staples of that era’s Miles Davis combos, Rollins has all the rhythmic ammunition to cut loose, be free, and extrapolate on themes as only he could, and still can. This is most evident on his version of “The Most Beautiful Girl in the World,” started in its normal choppy waltz time, followed by a sax/drums prelude, a drum solo from Jones, and steamed from there on in, a hot 4/4 romp. Garland is particularly outstanding for keeping up the pace, depth and placement on this one. A bluesy version of “When Your Lover Has Gone,” again enlivened by Jones, and the legendary title track with Rollins and John Coltrane trading long solos, and fours with Jones, are tunes that in the mid-’50s defined the parlance “blowing session.” “Paul’s Pal,” in tribute to Chambers, has become a standard in its own right with a bright, memorable melody showing the good humor of Rollins, especially on the second time through, while the saxophonist’s ability to sing vocal like tones through his horn is no better evinced as during the light ballad “My Reverie.” A recording that should stand proudly alongside Saxophone Colossus as some of the best work of Sonny Rollins in his early years, it’s also a testament to the validity, vibrancy, and depth of modern jazz in the post-World War era. It belongs on everybody’s shelf.

Tracklist

01. Tenor Madness
02. When Your Lover Has Gone
03. Paul’s Pal
04. My Reverie
05. The Most Beautiful Girl In The World

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The Modern Jazz Quartet – Fontessa

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This 1956 record marked the beginning of the Modern Jazz Quartet’s long and fruitful relationship with Atlantic Records and was one of their most inspired visits to a studio. While there had been excellent bands in the past that created a chamber-jazz genre, such as Red Norvo’s trio, John Lewis’s vision of a fusion of jazz and classical elements was distinctly original. It’s apparent here in the controlled counterpoint of “Versailles,” the extended first recording on “Fontessa,” with Lewis’s spare and precise piano perfectly complementing the looser swing of Milt Jackson’s glistening vibraphone sound. The group mingles beautifully around Percy Heath’s supple, melodic bass lines and Connie Kay’s discrete and gently propulsive beat. Jackson’s “Bluesology” and Dizzy Gillespie’s “Woody’n You” inspire boppish invention, while the limpidly beautiful standards “Willow Weep for Me” and “Angel Eyes” demonstrate Jackson’s ability to shift mood in a single phrase.

Tracklist

01. Versailles (Porte De Versailles)
02. Angel Eyes
03. Fontessa
04. Over The Rainbow
05. Bluesology
06. Willow Weep For Me
07. Woody’n You

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Sonny Rollins – Saxophone Colossus

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Though he lacked the improvisational fire of John Coltrane and the restless curiosity of Miles Davis, Sonny Rollins played with a rich, round tone that complimented his melodic inclinations, making him the most accessible of the post-bop musicians. Saxophone Colossus is the most successful of the late ’50s albums that made his reputation. Rollins’ playing never falters; he’s backed by the redoubtable Max Roach on drums, Tommy Flannagan on piano, and Doug Watkins on bass. Rollins is equally at home with the lilting Caribbean air of “St. Thomas,” standards (“You Don’t Know What Love Is”), blues (“Strode Rode,” featuring a driving Tommy Flannagan solo), and a smoldering version of Brecht-Weill’s “Moritat” (better known as “Mac the Knife”). If you are new to jazz, there is no better place to start than Saxophone Colossus.

Tracklist

01. St. Thomas
02. You Don’t Know What Love Is
03. Strode Rode
04. Moritat
05. Blue 7

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Thelonious Monk – Brilliant Corners

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Few composers or improvisers can match the originality of pianist Thelonious Monk. Quirky yet rigorously logical, Monk’s playful but always purposeful choice of skewed melodies and interrupted rhythm patterns gave the bebop movement, and jazz in total, a new sound that was totally modern. Although he created a surprisingly limited body of compositions, his impact on the vocabulary and canon of jazz is second to none, including such prolific giants as Duke Ellington. Brilliant Corners is a triumph of both performance and conception: the two small-group sessions, anchored by Monk, drummer Max Roach, and the bass work of either Oscar Pettiford or Paul Chambers, feature superb front-line performances by saxophonists Sonny Rollins and the tragically under-recorded Ernie Henry, as well as trumpeter Clark Terry. The title track, which centers the collection, is one of Monk’s most unconventional pieces, skirting whole-tone, chromatic and Lydian scales; a version of “Pannonica” finds Monk doubling on celeste, while the band stretches out on “Bemsha Swing” and the blues “Ba-lue Bolivar Ba-lues-are.”

Tracklist

01. Brilliant Corners
02. Ba-Lue Bolivar Ba-Lues-Are
03. Pannonica
04. I Surrender, Dear
05. Bemsha Swing

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Hank Mobley, Al Cohn, John Coltrane, Zoot Sims – Tenor Conclave

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This September 7, 1956 session is a loose blowing date that reprises the notion of a four saxophone concord as it was originally presented by the Four Brothers in Woody Herman’s boppish late ’40s big band, the Thundering Herd. Tenor brothers Al Cohn and Zoot Sims join forces with Hank Mobley and John Coltrane to depict the kind of good-natured, after hours cutting sessions that helped young improvisers determine how far they had come, and how much more work remained to be done. The superb rhythm section of Red Garland, Paul Chambers and Art Taylor helps make Tenor Concalve more than just another exercise in technical bluster. As he did with Miles Davis, pianist Garland custom tailors his accompaniment to fit the style of each soloist, while bassist Chambers offers the kind of matchless harmonic and rhythmic virtuosity that made his name synonymous with modern jazz bass playing in the late ’50s. Dig how they team with drummer Taylor to urge on each soloist on Mobley’s title tune, and when they go to Chambers for two choruses of expressively bowed bass, the groove never lags or falters. “Just You, Just Me” offers up a modern set of chord changes to navigate (Monk’s tricky melody “Evidence.”) The ensemble work suggests the warm interplay of the original Four Brothers, and Mobley’s simmering rhythmic ideas and burnished sound function as a prelude for Zoot Sims’ garrulous Lesterisms, and floating rhythmic ideas. Coltrane enters with a hard, keening cry, the ideas rapidly unfurling in the harmonic wind tunnel of his imagination. He holds things in check enough to accommodate Cohn’s contrasting timbre and rhythm style, and all four players display enormous empathy during their concluding round-robin exchanges.

Tracklist

01. Tenor Conclave
02. Just You, Just Me
03. Bob’s Boys
04. How Deep Is The Ocean

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Miles Davis Albums!

Miles Dewey Davis III (May 26, 1926 – September 28, 1991) was an American jazz trumpeter, bandleader, and composer.

Widely considered one of the most influential musicians of the 20th century, Miles Davis was, with his musical groups, at the forefront of several major developments in jazz music, including bebop, cool jazz, hard bop, modal jazz, and jazz fusion. Many well-known musicians rose to prominence as members of Davis’ ensembles, including saxophonists Gerry Mulligan, John Coltrane, Cannonball Adderley, George Coleman, Wayne Shorter, and Kenny Garrett; trombonist J. J. Johnson; pianists Bill Evans, Herbie Hancock, Chick Corea, and Keith Jarrett; guitarists John McLaughlin, John Scofield and Mike Stern; bassists Paul Chambers, Ron Carter, and Dave Holland; and drummers Tony Williams, Billy Cobham and Jack DeJohnette.

On October 7, 2008, his album Kind of Blue, released in 1959, received its fourth platinum certification from the RIAA, signifying sales of 4 million copies. Miles Davis was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 2006. Davis was noted as “one of the key figures in the history of jazz”.

On November 5, 2009, Rep. John Conyers of Michigan sponsored a measure in the US House of Representatives to recognize and commemorate the album Kind of Blue on its 50th anniversary. The measure also affirms jazz as a national treasure and “encourages the United States government to preserve and advance the art form of jazz music.” It passed, unanimously, with a vote of 409–0 on December 15, 2009.

for more info: wikipedia.org/wiki/Miles_Davis

Click on Read more and then you can find 115 Album, if you notes any missed album please leave a comment or contact me at mail ;)
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Coleman Hawkins – Body and Soul

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Named after Hawkins’ 1939 proto-bebop classic, this legendary collection proves why Hawkins is considered by many the finest tenor ever. Picking up his career after a stint alongside Louis Armstrong in Fletcher Henderson’s big band and five years in prewar Europe, BODY AND SOUL focuses on Hawkins’ essential small group sides of the ’40s. Here the former swing enthusiast helped create bebop with the help of future jazz icons Benny Carter, J.J. Johnson, Zoot Sims and Max Roach. From “Meet Doctor Foo” to “Angel Face,” Hawkins transforms standards like “My Blue Heaven” into something startlingly new and creates originals like “Bouncing With Bean” that would go on to influenced an entire generation of players. The mid-’50s orchestral sessions that end the album show Hawkins’ eagerness to bring bebop’s structures into new arenas, and the lovely, string-laden remake of the title track indicates that the experiment was a success.

Recorded at RCA Studios, New York, New York between 1939 and 1956. Includes liner notes by Dan Morgenstern.

Tracklist

01. Meet Doctor Foo
02. Fine Dinner
03. She’s Funny That Way
04. Body And Soul
05. When Day Is Done
06. The Sheik Of Araby
07. My Blue Heaven
08. Bouncing With Bean
09. April In Paris
10. How Strange
11. Haf Steps Down Please
12. Angel Face
13. Jumping For Jane
14. I Love You
15. There Will Never Be Another You
16. Little Girl Blue
17. Dinner For One Please James
18. His Very Own Blues
19. 39-25-39
20. The Bean Stalks Again
21. Have You Met Miss Jones
22. Body And Soul
23. The Essence Of You

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