Carlitta Durand – Nostalgic Nights

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Carlitta Durand, mostly know for his appearance on Little Brother and The Foreign Exchange albums has just released this free EP named “Nostalgic Nights” featuring productions from Brooklyn producer Jay Sentine, France’s Swan Dito, San Diego’s Abjo and Doug & Patty and M1 Platoon producer, Vaughn Garcia, enjoy!

for more info check: myspace.com/missdurand

Tracklist

01. Nostalgic Nights
02. Carl
03. Sweet July
04. Forrest Gump
05. Peace
06. Occupied
07. 23rd Floor
08. Lucky Star

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Pete Philly – Open Loops

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‘As I’m getting ready to record my upcoming album ‘One’ I first want to share my first installment of Open Loops. ‘Open Loop’ is a term coined by David Allen “An Open Loop is anything pulling at your attention that doesn’t belong where it is, the way it is.” It’s a thought that won’t leave you till you deal with it. My thoughts, of course, become tracks. I’m releasing one ‘Open Loop’ every week for fourteen weeks on petephilly.com You can download them for free and leave a comment to tell me what you think. I’ve put a lot of love into this project, so please feel free to share these tracks.Every monday you can download a free Open Loop on petephilly.coms.

for more info check: www.petephilly.com

He released the last track yesterday so these are the 14 tracks all in one, enjoy!

Tracklist

01. Encore Une Fois
02. Free
03. Changing
04. Non A Dem feat. Ziggi Recado
05. Remember You feat. Roos Jonker
06. Movin’ On
07. US feat. Collective Efforts
08. Mirror
09. R Hood
10. Truth Be Told
11. Girls Wonderful feat. Rockattack Ten
12. Honesty
13. Movin’ On with Bejamin Herman Quartet
14. Changing (SirOJ RMX)

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Incise – Familiar Voices

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Familiar Voices is an emotional rollercoaster of organically infused beats, driven by a balanced combination of analog and electronic elements. This instrumental album is based on 2 of incise’s Japanese hip hop album releases entitled: Nobody’s Story (2008) & Daily Methods (2010). It features a smooth jazzy combination of soulful beats from both albums and contains a few unreleased tracks.

for more info check: www.kitchendip.com

Tracklist

01. a new beginning
02. the wait
03. 2 moons
04. garden
05. brisk
06. time
07. still rising
08. drift away
09. your soul
10. magic
11. changes
12. phased
13. a new day
14. kick it back
15. hope
16. first fall
17. winter winds
18. rewind
19. textures
20. through you

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Sitdown With DJ Premier & Pete Rock

A nice 1 hour interview from the DJ Premier vs Pete Rock DVD released in Japan, enjoy!

Freddie Hubbard – The Body & The Soul

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1963′s The Body & The Soul finds a 25-year-old Freddie Hubbard commanding three different ensembles. The first ensemble is a stellar septet that features the sublime Eric Dolphy on alto saxophone and flute and Hubbard’s frequent collaborator, Wayne Shorter on tenor saxophone. One highlight is a gentle and memorable rendition of the classic “Body and Soul,” with Hubbard’s improvisations sliding closely around the well-loved melody. Dolphy’s ethereal flute provides a parenthetical introduction and coda. Where the septet shows Hubbard in familiar light, the larger ensembles show evidence of his young talent ready to blossom.

For the second and third ensembles, Shorter is back, serving as conductor and arranger and expanding into big-band and string arrangements. Though it would seem that such a lineup might heavily favor avant-garde experimentalism, two older standards, “Skylark,” by Hoagy Charmichael, and “I Got It Bad (And That Ain’t Good),” by Duke Ellington, are given reverential treatments. Hubbard’s playing is sensuous and articulate throughout. The Body & The Soul features two of the most formidable players and composers of ’60s and ’70s jazz expanding into new territory, all the while holding true to the music’s rich history.

Tracklist

01. Body and Soul
02. Carnival (Manha De Carnaval)
03. Chocolate Shake
04. Dedicated To You
05. Clarence’s Place
06. Aries
07. Skylark
08. I Got It Bad (And That Ain’t Good)
09. Thermo

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John Coltrane – Expression

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John Coltrane’s work with Dizzy Gillespie, Miles Davis and Thelonious Monk, his roots in Charlie Parker and Dexter Gordon, and his mastery of traditional harmony granted him a musical license that other experimentalists such as Cecil Taylor and Ornette Coleman never enjoyed. They were always viewed as musical outsiders, whereas Coltrane’s pedigree was beyond reproach. Which is why John Coltrane’s death on July 17, 1967, a few months shy of his 41st birthday, was such a devastating shock to the jazz community. Coltrane had become a creative lightning rod for the new generation, and his music was synonymous with the liberating energy of the ’60s. Upon his passing, a creative and spiritual void manifested itself, to be filled by cutting edge rockers such as Jimi Hendrix and Cream, and a new generation of electric jazzmen–spearheaded by many of his devotees and his old mentor, Miles Davis.

Coltrane’s swan song, Expression is comprised of two sessions from the winter of 1967. “Ogunde” begins as an ecstatic ballad, with Trane’s cantorish testimonies rising to a fever pitch over wife Alice’s droning chords and Rashid Ali’s feathery brush work. “Offering” begins with keening lyric ideas and rolling rhythms (reminiscent of “A Love Supreme”), alternating with moments of rhythmic abstraction–leading to some electrifying free-form variations with drummer Ali, culminating in a sweeping romantic gesture of uncommon serenity and acceptance.

“Expression” extends on the mellifluous finale of “Offering.” Trane’s stirring prelude sets up Alice Coltrane’s roiling piano solo, until the tenor returns with extravagant, billowing phrases. In closing, the previously unreleased “Number One” offers a clear snapshot of the quintet’s special brand of group improvisation: As the rhythm section feeds their leader a churning stream of sounds and colors, Coltrane works fervently to develop ideas that transcend his beloved chord changes. In the end, there is a note of frustration to this final performance. John Coltrane had run out of time, with much left to accomplish. Listeners should return to “Offering,” and wonder at just how much jubilation John Coltrane left behind.

Tracklist

01. Ogunde
02. To Be
03. Offering
04. Expression
05. Number One

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Dizzy Gillespie – Stan Getz – Diz and Getz

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Dizzy Gillespie was at the peak of his powers throughout the 1950s, still the pacesetter among trumpeters. This double CD matches Dizzy with Stan Getz, the Oscar Peterson Trio and drummer Max Roach. Getz, although identified with the “cool” school, thrived on competition and is both relaxed and combative on the uptempo explorations of “It Don’t Mean a Thing” and “Impromptu.”

Tracklist

01. It Don’t Mean A Thing (If It Ain’t Got That Swing)
02. I Let A Song Go Out Of My Heart
03. Exactly Like You
04. It’s The Talk Of The Town
05. Improptu
06. One Alone
07. Girl Of My Dreams
08. Siboney (Part I)
09. Siboney (Part II)

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George Benson – White Rabbit

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Recorded in three days in 1971, this CTI recording has been lauded as one of George Benson’s best releases. A stellar cast of musicians–all in their best form–are featured on WHITE RABBIT, including Herbie Hancock, Ron Carter, Billy Cobham, Hubert Laws, and Benson’s then-young protege, Earl Klugh. Arranger Don Sebesky creates some of the most creative twists on the popular songs of the time such as “White Rabbit” and “California Dreamin,” as well as on Hector Villa-Lobos’ “Little Train.” The recording has a Spanish flavor throughout, as well as a mysterious, psychedelic tinge reminiscent of the time it was recorded. The players put forth the kind of energy that is rarely found in recordings. Benson’s guitar playing here is the stuff that has made him famous.

Tracklist

01. White Rabbit
02. Theme From ‘Summer Of ’42′
03. Little Train
04. California Dreamin’
05. El Mar

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The Modern Jazz Quartet – Fontessa

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This 1956 record marked the beginning of the Modern Jazz Quartet’s long and fruitful relationship with Atlantic Records and was one of their most inspired visits to a studio. While there had been excellent bands in the past that created a chamber-jazz genre, such as Red Norvo’s trio, John Lewis’s vision of a fusion of jazz and classical elements was distinctly original. It’s apparent here in the controlled counterpoint of “Versailles,” the extended first recording on “Fontessa,” with Lewis’s spare and precise piano perfectly complementing the looser swing of Milt Jackson’s glistening vibraphone sound. The group mingles beautifully around Percy Heath’s supple, melodic bass lines and Connie Kay’s discrete and gently propulsive beat. Jackson’s “Bluesology” and Dizzy Gillespie’s “Woody’n You” inspire boppish invention, while the limpidly beautiful standards “Willow Weep for Me” and “Angel Eyes” demonstrate Jackson’s ability to shift mood in a single phrase.

Tracklist

01. Versailles (Porte De Versailles)
02. Angel Eyes
03. Fontessa
04. Over The Rainbow
05. Bluesology
06. Willow Weep For Me
07. Woody’n You

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Thelonious Monk – Monk’s Dream

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These 1962 recordings were Thelonious Monk’s first for Columbia Records, with whom he spent the most commercially successful years of his career. Mixing his own highly personalized renditions of standards with originals, this was a pattern he followed for all of his subsequent releases with the label. Of his originals, only “Bright Mississippi” had never been recorded before, but after decades of toiling in obscurity, the re-recording of tunes such as “Bolivar Blues” and “Bye-Ya” was most certainly warranted. This is in part because they’d not been heard before by most of his new and wide audience, and also because this quartet (with Charlie Rouse, John Ore and Frankie Dunlop) had been playing at this point for two years–longer than he’d ever been able to keep an ensemble together before–and they’d settled into Monk’s music like one charismatic and multi-limbed being.

Tracklist

01. Monk’s Dream
02. Body and Soul
03. Bright Mississippi
04. Blues Five Spot
05. Blue Bolivar Blues
06. Just a Gigolo
07. Bye-ya
08. Sweet and Lovely
09. Monk’s Dream (Take 3)
10. Body and Soul (Take 1)
11. Bright Mississippi (Take 3)
12. Blue Bolivar Blues (Take 1)

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Clifford Jordan – Spellbound

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Tenor saxophonist Clifford Jordan was sponsored by Cannonball Adderley on this set for Riverside. At this point, Jordan did not quite have the distinctive sound that he would develop in his period with Charles Mingus, but he was already a strong hard bop stylist. Assisted by pianist Cedar Walton, bassist Spanky DeBrest, and drummer Albert “Tootie” Heath, Jordan performs four originals (“Toy” is best known), an unusual waltz version of “Lush Life,” the ballad “Last Night When We Were Young,” and the romping Charlie Parker blues “Au Privave.” It’s an excellent straight-ahead outing.

Tracklist

01. Toy
02. Lush Life
03. Moon-A-Tic
04. Spellbound
05. Hot Water
06. Last Night When We Were Young
07. Au Privave

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Roland Kirk – I Talk With The Spirits

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On 1964′s flute showcase I Talk With The Spirits, (Rahsaan) Roland Kirk plays no reeds at all and, by necessity, only plays one flute at a time. However, unlike the majority of hopelessly twee jazz flautists, Kirk’s creativity is boundless. Playing with a grace and clarity comparable to Herbie Mann, singing and moaning into the instrument or using the noise of the flute’s keys as percussion, Kirk stands the conventions of the jazz flute record on their head.

I Talk With The Spirits is quintessential Kirk, rarely just-pretty (though the melody of “Serenade To A Cuckoo” is possibly the loveliest of his career) and at times quite corrosive. As he wrote in the original album’s liner notes, “I don’t think it sounds at all like the flute album you expect to hear.” This Verve reissue is flawless, with beautifully remastered sound that adds previously unheard depth and spaciousness to the sound of Kirk’s quartet.

Tracklist

01. Serenade To a Cuckoo
02. 02. We’ll Be Together Again – People (from “Funny Face”)
03. A Quote From Clifford Brown
04. Trees
05. Fugue’n and Alludin’
06. The Business Ain’t Nothin’ But The Blues
07. I Talk With The Spirits
08. Ruined Castles
09. Django
10. My Ship (from “Lady In The Dark”)

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Dexter Gordon – Ballads

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The reputation of tenor saxophonist Dexter Gordon was destined to be overshadowed by John Coltrane and Sonny Rollins, not to mention the three titans of the previous era–Ben Webster, Lester Young and Coleman Hawkins. This wouldn’t matter so much if Gordon wasn’t a musician of the first rank himself. Indeed, Coltrane initially derived much of his hard, piercing sound from the older bop player. Part of the problem is that there isn’t one key Dexter Gordon album that crystalizes his achievement, not like Rollin’s Saxophone Colossus or Coltrane’s Giant Steps or A Love Supreme.

Ballads partially fills this gap and is an excellent introduction to Gordon’s tenor artistry. Compiled from a number of mostly ’60s Blue Note sessions, these familar standards, including Billie’s “Don’t Explain” and Sinatra’s “I’m A Fool To Want You,” are given long and bracing workouts in the modern tenor style. Underrated Gordon might have been, but he was never outdated. The grand finale is an electrifying 16-minute “Body And Soul,” recorded live in 1978, which includes a nearly 4-minute unaccompanied cadenza.

Tracklist

01. Darn That Dream
02. Don’t Explain
03. I’m A Fool To Want You
04. Ernie’s Tune
05. You’ve Changed
06. Willow Weep For Me
07. Guess I’ll Hang My Tears Out To Dry
08. Body and Soul

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Luis Bacalov – Rebus

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An excellent mod soundtrack to this wild film from 1968, starring Ann Margret and Laurence Harvey, and featuring music by the Italian composer Luis Bacalov! Bacalov’s work these days is pretty sedate – but back in the 60s, he could really come up with a groovy batch of tracks when he wanted to, and on this one, he definitely wanted to! The tracks have great mod drums, electric bass, and plenty of organ – plus occasional subtler instrumentation – and the album also features Ann Margaret singing the song “Take a Chance”, a driving dancing number that ranks with her best soundtrack performances from the 60s! Other tracks include “Rebus”, “Suddenly The Rain”, and many different “Rebus” sequences.

Tracklist

01. Take a Chance (Instrumental Main Titles)
02. Rebus (Seq.1)
03. Rebus (Seq.2)
04. Rebus (Seq.3)
05. Rebus (Seq.4)
06. Rebus (Seq.5)
07. Rebus (Seq.6)
08. Take A Chance (Vocals by Ann-Margret)
09. Suddenly The Rain (Vocals by Ann-Margret)
10. Rebus (seq. 7)
11. Rebus (seq. 8)
12. Rebus (seq. 9)
13. Rebus (seq. 10)
14. Rebus (seq. 11)
15. Take A Chance (End Titles)

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Arawak – Accadde A…….

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The very small Italian label Squirrel has a unique sound. This library LP is a kind of musical world tour, and the band seems to travel from a destination to another, giving a powerful and sharp groove.

little preview:

Tracklist

01. Accadee a Harlem
02. Accadde a Cuzco
03. Accadde a Bali
04. Accadde a Bahia
05. Accadde a Belfast
06. Accadde a Tutti Noi
07. Accadde a Las Vegas
08. Accadde In Biafra
09. Accadde a Yellow Park
10. Accadde a Lima
11. Accadde ad Atene
12. Accadde a Boston

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Art Blakey – Orgy in Rhythm Vol.1&2

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The brainchild of Art Blakey and Blue Note producer Alfred Lion, Orgy in Rhythm Vol.1&2 is a milestone in recorded jazz. Blakey gathered together some of the best jazz drummers and Latin percussionists around for an improvised session in 1957. To this he added renowned flautist Herbie Mann, pianist Ray Bryant and bassist Wendall Marshall for melodic and harmonic support. Make no mistake, however–the focus here is exactly what the title suggests. This is a percussion extravaganza that pushes the drums to the forefront as in the traditional African music that formed the roots of jazz.

Long, hypnotic grooves, wailing chants and grounding bass tones support extended solos by Blakey, Arthur Taylor, Jo Jones and percussionist Sabu. While billed as Blakey’s record, it was certainly a collective effort that brought his rhythmic collages to life. The difficulty in recording such a large ensemble of percussion instruments fell to legendary engineer Rudy Van Gelder, who did a commendable job here; the enormity of the sound must be heard to be believed. Highlight tracks include the wailing “Buhaina Chant,” the expressive “Elephant Walk” and the stunning drum set feature “Split Skins.”

Tracklist

01. Buhaina Chant
02. Ya Ya
03. Toffi
04. Split Skins
05. Amuck
06. Elephant Walk
07. Come Out and Meet Me Tonight
08. Adallah’s Delight

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Max Roach – It’s Time

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An unusual set, this outing featured the drummer’s all-star sextet (which consisted of trumpeter Richard Williams, tenor-saxophonist Clifford Jordan, trombonist Julian Priester, pianist Mal Waldron and bassist Art Davis) joined by a vocal choir conducted by Coleridge Perkinson and orchestrated by Roach (who contributed all six originals). Unlike most other collaborations, the choir was not overly gospel-oriented and was utilized as a sort-of jazz ensemble. Each of the horns has a feature or two and singer Abbey Lincoln stars on “Lonesome Lover.” But despite the sincerity of this effort, there are times when one wishes the choir would leave altogether and let the quintet really stretch out.

Tracklist

01. It’s Time
02. Another Valley
03. Sunny Afternoon
04. Living Room
05. The Profit
06. Lonesome Lover

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Sam Rivers – Contours

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Saxophonist Sam Rivers certainly assembled a team of hot soloists for this album. However, his compositions are more than just vehicles for improvisation. Rivers’s largely angular, even jarring, melodies clearly seek to define a new direction in jazz; they do not fall back on bebop forms or hard-bop funkiness. Each composition contains an abstract “head” and the harmonic underpinning flatly rejects the usual chord progressions found in most standard repertoire. On this 1965 date, Rivers and his band also avoid the blues format.

“Mellifluous Cacophony” (performed twice here) is one such example. On this composition, Rivers begins with an asymmetrical melody that suggests atonality. However, the soloing remains firmly rooted in the jazz lexicon, as pianist Herbie Hancock, trumpeter Freddie Hubbard, and Rivers himself rip into these changes with abandon. “Euterpe” is an ethereal ballad replete with a long, free-floating form and stream-of-consciousness solos from the quintet. Rivers’s own flute solo is marked by questing lines and exquisite modal excursions. Overall, this is intellectually stimulating music that avoids precise definition. Suffice to say, Contours is forward-looking jazz at its best.

Tracklist

01. Point Of Many Returns
02. Dance Of The Tripedal
03. Euterpe
04. Mellifluous Cacophony
05. Mellifluous Cacophony (Alternate Take)

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McCoy Tyner – Song For My Lady

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A dynamic album from Tyner – recorded with a core group that includes Sonny Fortune on reeds, Calvin Hill on bass, and Alphonze Mouzon on drums – plus additional work on some tracks by Charles Tolliver, Michael White, and Mtume! With a lineup like that, it’s hard to miss – but even so, Tyner’s still the real focus of the session – pounding up and down the keyboard with fury, really driving on the other players with his core inspiration here!

props to my “Nonna”

Tracklist

01. Native Song
02. The Night Has a Thousand Eyes
03. Song For My Lady
04. A Silent Tear
05. Essence

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Lafayette Afro Rock Band – Soul Makossa

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Recorded in Paris and New York under the production guidance of Pierre Jaubert (“Berjot”), the Lafayette Afro-Rock Band were a jazz-based super session group that created a heavy, dense, no compromise ghetto funk that has since been sampled by everyone from Public Enemy to Wreckz ‘N’ Effect.

Soul Makossa was the debut release of the Lafayette Afro-Rock Band. At the time the band’s popularity was primarily contained within Europe, but the album is now considered a raw funk gem by collectors everywhere. Everyone was quick to recognize such an abundance of talent in one group. Such classics as “Hihache and “Voodounon” have secured the band’s place in funk history.

At this point, we could go on and on, but for those who already know the band, you will be fully aware of what we mean. For those who are listening for the first time, the Lafayette Afro-Rock Band’s bandwagon is becoming larger and is ready to take people on their heaviest musical trip.

Tracklist

01. Soul Makossa
02. Azeta
03. M.F. Grayson
04. Oglenon
05. Hihache
06. Voodounon
07. Right Foot
08. Nicky ‘First One’

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