Finest Ego – Russian Beatmaker Compilation

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The tendency towards advanced beats seems to be more and more a global phenomenon. As we already have said: Decentred beats for decentred people. During the last few years arose also in Russia a small, loosely networked scene of people, who have experimented with Hip Hop-beats. But in this case, the young Russians have no examples or references for this kind of music in the musical culture of their own country. All of their inspirations are taken from blogs and from the intensive study of their role models worldwide. The result is an organic, very playful, snappy and jazzy sound, which is carried by a common vibe, but is in the same way as diverse as the finest egos of the artists themselves.

The compilation includes Pavel Dovgal, DZA, Pixelord, Demokracy, Moa Pillar, Arktor, Shawalski, Myown, Nienvox, 813 and Long Arm.

for more info check: www.finestego.com

Tracklist

01. Pavel Dovgal – Is On Fire
02. Pixelord – Zero One
03. Demokracy – Searchlight
04. Moa Pillar – Way Of Wind
05. Artktor – Henry Dorsett Case
06. DZA – Fireball
07. Shawalski – Gettin Hi
08. Myown – Vladislav Kovac
09. Nienvox – Hairs
10. 813 – Gamma
11. Long Arm – The Roots

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SoulChef – Escapism

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SoulChef is a producer / composer / musician from Auckland, New Zealand. His music is a smooth and versatile blend of jazz, soul and hip hop. For more info and buy: www.soulchefmusic.com

Tracklist

01. Drifting In A Daydream feat. Need Not Worry
02. When I Close My Eyes feat. Tunji
03. Franki Valli feat. The Outfit
04. Eyes Like Blue Skies
05. Away With Me feat. Nicholas Smalc
06. What You Rappin’ For feat. Nieve
07. Wanted feat. The 49ers
08. Say Somethin’ feat. Nieve, Noah King, Adbu & Tunji
09. Oh No feat. Hydroponikz
10. I Just Wanna See feat. KO The Knockout
11. Tonight feat. Deep Foundation & Ashley Robles
12. First Class feat. Nicholas Smalc
13. Blunt Love
14. Write This Down feat. Nieve
15. The Rest Of My Life feat. Awon & Tif The Gift
16. Blind Man See feat. The 49ers

Link removed in request of SoulChef – BUY HERE: iTunes

Sonny Rollins – Saxophone Colossus

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Though he lacked the improvisational fire of John Coltrane and the restless curiosity of Miles Davis, Sonny Rollins played with a rich, round tone that complimented his melodic inclinations, making him the most accessible of the post-bop musicians. Saxophone Colossus is the most successful of the late ’50s albums that made his reputation. Rollins’ playing never falters; he’s backed by the redoubtable Max Roach on drums, Tommy Flannagan on piano, and Doug Watkins on bass. Rollins is equally at home with the lilting Caribbean air of “St. Thomas,” standards (“You Don’t Know What Love Is”), blues (“Strode Rode,” featuring a driving Tommy Flannagan solo), and a smoldering version of Brecht-Weill’s “Moritat” (better known as “Mac the Knife”). If you are new to jazz, there is no better place to start than Saxophone Colossus.

Tracklist

01. St. Thomas
02. You Don’t Know What Love Is
03. Strode Rode
04. Moritat
05. Blue 7

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Booker Ervin – The Trance

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This music was taped at the beginning of the 1965 Munich, Germany session that also produced the Ervin/Dexter Gordon encounter Setting the Pace Prestige 24123. It captures the same controlled frenzy that made Ervin’s Stateside studio encounters with pianist Jaki Byard and drummer Alan Dawson such revelations see The Freedom Book, OJC 845, and The Space Book, OJC 896, with the very personal iconoclasm of bassist Reggie Workman an apt replacement for Richard Davis’s work on the earlier albums. The material is relatively straightforward one blues, one standard, and the lean title track in a minor mode but the ability of Ervin and his partners to take inside playing to the edge ensures music of constant freshness. “The Trance,” the saxophonist’s tribute to the recently deceased bassist George Tucker, takes its place with “A Day to Mourn” on The Freedom Book as one of the most haunting jazz memorials of the era.

Tracklist

01. The Trance
02. Speak Low
03. Groovin’ At The Jamboree

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Hank Mobley – Soul Station

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This 1960 session broke the usual Blue Note quintet mold, with Mobley’s tenor saxophone featured with just a rhythm section, one that happened to be the best of the era. Pianist Wynton Kelly and bassist Paul Chambers were working regularly with Mobley in Miles Davis’s band, while the explosive drummer Art Blakey had worked with him in the original, cooperative form of the Jazz Messengers, and the familiarity shows. Blue Note had a reputation for producing “meat ‘n’ potatoes” jazz, and no musician would better fit the description than Mobley, who went about the task of making music with a workmanlike focus and a consistency that didn’t attract nearly the attention it deserved. Mobley was one of the most talented saxophonists of his generation, a superbly lyrical artist who blended an inventive tunefulness with taut rhythmic attentiveness. The flowing blues of the title track is a particularly fine example of his art. And to say this session is exemplary would be an understatement. A true classic.

Tracklist

01. Remember
02. This I Dig Of You
03. Dig Dis
04. Split Feelin’s
05. Soul Station
06. If I Should Lose You

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Pete La Roca – Turkish Women At The Bath

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A “lost” classic of spiritual free jazz, Turkish Women is a charming session inspired by the decadent Ingres painting of the same name. This late 1960s session brought together the fiery, refined tenor sax of John Gilmore; the ruminative acoustic piano of (pre-fusion) Chick Corea; the heavy, hefty-duty bass of Walter Booker; and leader Pete LaRoca. LaRoca, who left music shortly after this 1967 session to devote his time to the art of law, is a contrapuntal percussionist who’s even credited in The Rough Guide to Jazz as “the first person to record a totally free-tempo drum solo.” It’s an ensemble effort, but longtime Sun Ra sideman Gilmore delivers a rare non-Arkestra performance that demonstrates why Coltrane was so clearly influenced by Gilmore’s tightly-controlled, sonic whirlwinds.

Tracklist

01. Turkis Women At The Bath
02. Dancing Girls
03. Love Planet
04. Marjoun
05. Bliss
06. Sin Street
07. And So

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Wayne Shorter – Juju

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When Wayne Shorter recorded this date in 1964, he was asserting his own voice as both a saxophonist and a composer after his years with Art Blakey’s Jazz Messengers. He’s joined here by pianist McCoy Tyner and drummer Elvin Jones, essential parts of the then dominant John Coltrane Quartet, but Juju serves to emphasize what was distinctive in Shorter’s approach as well as the similarities. Though he shared something of Coltrane’s twisting line and hard sound, Shorter was far more interested in crafting conventional compositions, and there’s a range of everyday emotions to be felt in this music that went untouched in Coltrane’s more intense work. Shorter’s a master of tension and release, using contrasting elements in a piece, mixing major and minor, consonance and dissonance, and different rhythms to evoke complex moods of doubt and playfulness or constraint and joyous swing. Those structures are a happy fit with Tyner and Jones as well, who can bring their characteristic welling intensity to “Juju,” a relaxed bounce to “Yes or No,” or a subtle oriental emphasis to “House of Jade.”

Tracklist

01. Juju
02. Deluge
03. House Of Jade
04. Mahjong
05. Yes Or No
06. Twelve More Bars To Go
07. Juju (Alternate Take)
08. House Of Jade (Alternate Take)

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Charlie Rouse – Takin’ Care Of Business

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Charlie Rouse’s debut as a leader. The distinctive tenor saxophonist, who had just started a decade-long stint as a member of the Thelonious Monk Quartet, teams up with trumpeter Blue Mitchell, pianist Walter Bishop, Jr., bassist Earl May, and drummer Art Taylor. Together they perform straight-ahead material including Rouse’s own uptempo “Upptankt,” the standard “They Didn’t Believe Me,” and songs by Mitchell, Kenny Drew, and Randy Weston. A fine modern mainstream jam session-flavored set.

Tracklist

01. Blue Farouq
02. ’204′
03. Upptankt
04. Wierdo
05. Pretty Strange
06. They Didn’t Believe Me

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The Modern Jazz Quartet – Pyramid

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This is a strong recording from the Modern Jazz Quartet, with inventive versions of John Lewis’ “Vendome,” Ray Brown’s “Pyramid,” Jim Hall’s “Romaine,” and Lewis’ famous “Django,” along with cooking jams on “How High the Moon” and “It Don’t Mean a Thing.” The MJQ had become a jazz institution by this time, but they never lost their creative edge, and their performances (even on the remakes) are quite stimulating, enthusiastic, and fresh.

Tracklist

01. Vendome
02. Pyramid
03. It Don’t Mean A Thing (If It Ain’t Got That Swing)
04. Django
05. How High The Moon
06. Romaine

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Billy Higgins, Ray Drummond, Hank Jones – The Essence

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Although bassist Ray Drummond is the leader of this trio set, he shares the spotlight quite evenly with pianist Hank Jones and drummer Billy Higgins. Drummond contributed two originals (including a tribute piece to Higgins) but otherwise the repertoire is comprised of jazz standards including “Things Ain’t What They Used to Be,” “Whisper Not,” “Love Walked In” and “Imagination.” Jones in particular is in excellent form on the fine modern mainstream set.

Tracklist

01. Things Ain’t What They Used To Be
02. Whisper Not
03. What Am I Here For
04. Emily
05. Allen’s Alley
06. The Essence
07. Love Walked In
08. Imagination
09. Mr Higgins, Suh

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JR And PH7 – The Update

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After releasing their critically acclaimed debut album “The Standard” last year they now return with their next effort, simply entitled  “The EP”. The six track strong EP features some of todays finest rap artists and once again JR & PH7 deliver powerful production that is deeply rooted in 70′s soul music that is sure to make one’s head nod within seconds. JR & PH7 from Cologne, Germany have been buzzing on the international underground hiphop scene for a while now. After meeting through the work for a german hip-hop label, the two decided to work together as a production duo back in 2007. 2 years later they found themselves releasing their debut album “The Standard” with an impressive cast of guest artists and since then have been contiously growing catalog of outside production. With the release of “The EP” the two sample and record digging nerds are now releasing their sophomore LP “The Update”, with all production by themselves and featuring rhymes from Access Immortal, Evidence, Torae, Rasco, Frank-N-Dank and more.

for more info and buy: myspace.com/jrph7

Tracklist

01. Intro
02. Bow Down feat. Evidence & L.E.G.A.C.Y.
03. Real Soul feat. Caucasian
04. Do It For you feat. Torae
05. Microphone Friends feat. EDO.G & Termanology
06. Freedom feat. Bambu, Rasco & Trek Life
07. Hustle and Flow feat. Oddisee & Olivier Day Soul
08. She Loves Me feat. Shawn Jackson
09. Let’s Get It feat. Rasco
10. Persuasion feat. Olivier Day Soul & Sean Price
11. Echoes feat. Access Immortal
12. Touch The Sky efat. Strange Fruit Project
13. I’m Okay feat. Kaydee & Rachel Schamber
14. The City feat. Frank-N-Dank & Elzhi
15. We Live feat. Theory Hazit
16. From L.A. To The Wind feat. Trek Life
17. Change feat. Buff1 & Larissa Sirah

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Kixnare – Digital Garden

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Kixnare, or Łukasz Maszczyński, is a dj and producer originally from Częstochowa now based in Kraków. His firm hip-hop roots have enabled him to grow musically in a way that today he takes inspiration from nearly every realm of sound. He had collaborated with many more and less known figures of the Polish hip-hop scene, but it was the 2007 project ”Class of 90′s ” that really put him on the map as one of the most creative producers in Poland. Since then he has been working hard to deliver that promise – honing his skills as a producer and experimenting with electronics. This is “Digital Garden” really good album.

for more info and buy check: myspace.com/kixnareuknowme.junoumi.com

Tracklist

01. Dawn
02. Computer Love
03. Dirty Old Maan
04. Natural High
05. Rising Sun
06. Diamonds
07. Boogie Back
08. Keepthat
09. Tomorrow
10. Never Do U Wrong
11. Knockout
12. The Groover
13. Heartbeat feat. Russell Tate

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Budamunky – Mokstrumentals Vol.2

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2nd volume by japan beatmaker Budamunky, enjoy! for more info and buy: myspace.com/budamunky

Tracklist

01. Tree Is Burnin’
02. Bounce
03. Let It Flow
04. Buds
05. Meriot
06. War
07. Drop
08. Loungin’
09. Ill Vibe

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Eric Lau – Beatstrumentals

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I do not have much info on this, it’s “just” a beat tape by Eric Lau, short but cool beats. Let me remind you that Eric has released “Makin’ Sound” some weeks ago,  you can buy it here: www.kilawattmusic.com), enjoy!

little preview:

Tracklist

01. Track 01
02. Track 02
03. Track 03
04. Track 04
05. Track 05
06. Track 06
07. Track 07
08. Track 08
09. Track 09
10. Track 10
11. Track 11

Link removed in request of Eric Lau

Freddie Joachim – Eleven

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Another good track by Freddie Joachim, enjoy!

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Oliver Nelson – The Blues and the Abstract Truth

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The late Oliver Nelson had such a successful career as a composer of film and TV music (“Theme From the Six Million Dollar Man”) and arranger that it often overshadowed his abilities as a jazz musician. In 1961, Nelson assembled a fantastic small ensemble, including Eric Dolphy, Bill Evans, and Freddie Hubbard, for a session of six original compositions. Nelson was also an excellent, bluesy-toned saxophonist (heard here on tenor and alto) and his tunes cover a variety of moods, from the elegiac “Stolen Moments” to the wryly humorous, Aaron Copeland-like “Hoe-Down” to the rippling “Cascades.” Dolphy’s edgy, vocally inspired alto sound, the surging brassy tone of Hubbard’s trumpet, and the swinging lyricism of Bill Evans make a potent combination, contributing to Blues’s status as a classic of post-bop jazz.

Tracklist

01. Stolen Moments
02. Hoe-Down
03. Cascades
04. Yeanin’
05. Butch and Butch
06. Teenie’s Blues

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Oscar Peterson – Reunion Blues

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Pianist Oscar Peterson joins up with his old friends, vibraphonist Milt Jackson and bassist Ray Brown, in addition to his drummer of the period, Louis Hayes, for a particularly enjoyable outing. After a throwaway version of the Rolling Stones’ “(I Can’t Get No) Satisfaction,” the all-star quartet performs Jackson’s title cut, Benny Carter’s ballad “Dream of You,” and four standards. Although not up to the excitement of Peterson’s best Pablo recordings of the 1970s, this is an enjoyable album.

Tracklist

01. Satisfaction
02. Dream Of You
03. Someday My Prince Will Come
04. A Time For Love
05. Reunion Blues
06. When I Fall In Love
07. Red Top

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Thelonious Monk – Brilliant Corners

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Few composers or improvisers can match the originality of pianist Thelonious Monk. Quirky yet rigorously logical, Monk’s playful but always purposeful choice of skewed melodies and interrupted rhythm patterns gave the bebop movement, and jazz in total, a new sound that was totally modern. Although he created a surprisingly limited body of compositions, his impact on the vocabulary and canon of jazz is second to none, including such prolific giants as Duke Ellington. Brilliant Corners is a triumph of both performance and conception: the two small-group sessions, anchored by Monk, drummer Max Roach, and the bass work of either Oscar Pettiford or Paul Chambers, feature superb front-line performances by saxophonists Sonny Rollins and the tragically under-recorded Ernie Henry, as well as trumpeter Clark Terry. The title track, which centers the collection, is one of Monk’s most unconventional pieces, skirting whole-tone, chromatic and Lydian scales; a version of “Pannonica” finds Monk doubling on celeste, while the band stretches out on “Bemsha Swing” and the blues “Ba-lue Bolivar Ba-lues-are.”

Tracklist

01. Brilliant Corners
02. Ba-Lue Bolivar Ba-Lues-Are
03. Pannonica
04. I Surrender, Dear
05. Bemsha Swing

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Phil Ranelin – Vibes from the Tribe

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An excellent lost classic from Detroit soul jazz powerhouse Phil Ranelin! Trombonist Ranelin was one of the key figures in the city’s Tribe Records scene – and this album is one of the greatest that the label ever issued. The set features Ranelin on trombone, Marcus Belgrave on trumpet, Kenny Cox on electric piano, and Harold McKinney on piano – plus other luminaries from the incredibly strong Detroit scene of the time. The set includes the funky classic “Sounds From The Village”, the slow spacey breakbeat number “Vibes From The Tribe”, and the jazzy groover “For The Children”. Also includes “He The One We All Knew”, an extended piece that features members of The Griot Galaxy – and the reissue features 3 bonus tracks “Vibes From The Tribe (extended)”, “Vibes From The Tribe (8 track)”, and “Sounds From The Village (extended)”.

Tracklist

01. Vibes From The Tribe
02. Sounds From The Village
03. Wife
04. For The Children
05. He The One We All Knew
06. Vibes From The Tribe (Extended)
07. Vibes From The Tribe (8-trk Version)
08. Sounds From The Village (Extended)

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Grant Green – Grantstand

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Grant Green’s third album to be released, Grantstand teams the clear-toned guitarist with an unlikely backing group of musicians who rarely appeared with Blue Note otherwise: tenor saxophonist Yusef Lateef (who doubles on flute), organist Brother Jack McDuff, and drummer Al Harewood. Although Lateef was beginning to delve deeply into Eastern tonalities and instruments around the same time, his playing here is pretty straightforward and swinging, fitting the relaxed, bop-tinged soul-jazz that makes up most of the session. For his part, McDuff is mellower than his usual ferocious self, laying back and swinging with a blissful ease. Green contributes two bluesy originals, the nine-minute title track and the 15-minute “Blues in Maude’s Flat,” which are turned into loose, loping jams that rank as some of the best examples of Green’s ability to work an extended groove. (The CD bonus track, “Green’s Greenery,” is in much the same vein, though not as long.) Elsewhere, Green leads a delicate, sensitive exploration of “My Funny Valentine” that ended up as his greatest standard performance to date, setting the stage for a great deal more work in this vein that was soon to be forthcoming (including his brilliant sessions with Sonny Clark). Still, the groove is what reigns supreme for most of the album; if you’re looking for Green the soul-jazz groovemaster, Grantstand is an excellent place to find him.

Tracklist

01. Grandstand
02. My Funny Valentine
03. Blues In Maude’s Flat
04. Old Folks
05. Green’s Greenery

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