Herbie Hancock – Sextant

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Released in 1973 but recorded in 1972, Sextant was Herbie Hancock’s first album on Columbia Records. It was, and remains extremely complex, and a harmonically and rhythmically challenging musical statement. Hancock was no stranger to electronic music, having used synthesisers extensively during his short time with Warner Bros. Records, but Sextant took his sound to a new level, and arguably pushed the boundaries of the growing jazz-fusion movement further than any of his contemporaries.

Sextant was by far the furthest Herbie Hancock ever pushed himself musically. While a select few were collectively wowed by his new approach, Hancock alienated the bulk of his audience, who found his sound extremely inaccessible. Made up of just three tracks, the album recalls many of Hancock’s critically acclaimed Blue Note recordings, but also points toward the commercial success he would enjoy in the 80s with Future Shock and Sound-System, among others. However, with Sextant, commercial success would have seemed a long way away.

Ironically, Hancock’s first recording on Columbia would be his last recording with his Mwandishi-era group, with Sextant’s poor album sales forcing him into the mainstream with Head Hunters.

little preview:

Tracklist

01. Rain Dance
02. Hidden Shadows
03. Hornets

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3 Responses to “Herbie Hancock – Sextant”

  1. sheikhyerbubi says:

    Just would like to say thank you so much for all your posts. You effort doesnt go unnoticed and I appreciate it from the bottom of my heart. Now on to this album. Hancock sounded a lot like Miles Davis. But the tight bass keeps everything in balance instead of running helter skelter like Bitches Brew. I like it. Though not as much as Headhunters but this is still a challenge for those willing to take the risk.

  2. sheikhyerbubi says:

    Just would like to say thank you so much for all your posts. You effort doesnt go unnoticed and I appreciate it from the bottom of my heart. Now on to this album. Hancock sounded a lot like Miles Davis. But the tight bass keeps everything in balance instead of running helter skelter like Bitches Brew. I like it. Though not as much as Headhunters but there’s a reward for those uninitiated willing to take the risk.

  3. M.I.N.T says:

    You site is outta sight , and I’m so glad I found it! You helped me expand my music just a notch, PEACE&LOVE!!!

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